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why war?
September 24, 2002
1:32 pm
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eve
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I'm really worried at the moment about the US planning a war. I know that the US never experienced a war in their own country. And that might make them less compassionate and make it easier for them to view war just as a means of acchieving a goal. Be it easy access to oil or be it getting rid of this pain in the ass dictator over there.... I don't think any of these reasons justify a war of active aggression against a country.

This might come because I grew up in a country where every adult alive today either lived during the war or has parents or grandparents who lived in a war zone (and their parents, too, during the war before). Politics aside - what I remember most from all the stories that my father and my grandparents told me are those two stories:

My Dad was walking home from school whith another boy of his class, when the alarm came. They went running for the air-raid shelter, when the other boy dropped his schoolbag. Now, you couldn't afford to loose a schoolbag in those days. Your parents wouldn't be able to afford a new one, and the teacher would propably hit you or at least yell at you in front of the class. So this boy went back the fifty meters to pick it up - and all my father remembers then is a sizzling sound, and that he only found a severed foot and the schoolbag in one piece, before he went running on, because he knew he couldn't help this boy any more.

The memories that my grandmother gave me, are not really linked to a story. Its more the haunted expression of her eyes when she recounted how she had to make do whith scarce money, never enough to eat, not enough hours in the day for all the work to be done. Two children that she didn't want to be indoctrinated by the nazi youth organizations - not so easy, when they give the kids a soup and some bread there. Her sister who insisted that she was proud to have lost her husband to world war one and then lost both of her sons to WWII during the first four weeks - seventeen and nineteen year old boys who were proud to go off to fight for the country. Her growing panic that the war would last long enough for my father to be drafted at the age of fourteen or fifteen. The hole in the forest, where my grandfather and one friend of his hid away during the last week of the war, because they didn't want to 'cannon-food' for russian or american tanks coming close. The fear that they would be discovered and shot dead by the nazis, because they didn't gladly go and get themselfs killed for Hitler. Half of the neighbour's house being torn to pieces in a bomb raid - the bed whith the child that couldn't be brought to the air-raid shelter because he was too sick to be moved, this bed was left standing, but there was no more walls, no more stairs or door to get to the childand they needed an hour to get there. This was in the night before the capitulation.

These are the reason that I, and many of my fellow Germans are opposed to war. This apparently makes people like me a personal enemy of president Bush, or of the American people in general, or so he says. I really don't understand. I don't understand why all the media and the press go whith this, and there is no oppositon to this 'let's smite Sadam' philosophy. 'Who is not whith us is our enemy'. At least none, that is audible over here - on the other side of the atlantic. Scary in my opinion.

September 24, 2002
5:36 pm
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Cici
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I'm with ya, eve. I read a great article in Salon about Al Gore making a 45 minute-long speech vigorously opposing a war effort. He mentioned the Gulf War and said that, as Iraq had invaded Quwait, our action was justified.

And consider this. Before the conflict in the Gulf under Bush Sr., he made an incredibel effort to garner support amongst many Arab nations prior to even discussing a possible attack. Now that the U.S. has taken a vocal pro-Israel stance, and we plan to attack Iraq as well - where does that leave us in terms of international relations with the rest of the world?

I am a patriotic person, but I am all for maintaining international relations and attending to the balance of power that was very carefully crafted after the creation of the United Nations and WWII.

Now, check this out:
http://www.salon.com/news/feat.....index.html

We are being accused of forging a new brand of imperialism. That is a terribly frightening thought.

This is a good summation of the (LACK OF) American Foreign policy under Bush Jr.:

http://www.salon.com/news/feat.....index.html

Here's a thought. The war on terrorism promises to be long and drawn out - longer perhaps than any other concerted military operation in our history. So - how to keep the public attention, the lifeblood of any successful government action? Focus on an immediate goal. One which is observeable, tangible, and memorable. Distract Americans with a war effort against an actualy soverign country, rather than the coterie of loosly associated individuals and organizations that we currently oppose. Blah.

It IS scarey. We should be very afraid. That fact that we aren't is even more disturbing.

September 25, 2002
4:08 pm
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eve
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Thanks Cici, for the links and for the thumbs up.

Does anybody discuss how to get to the roots of terrorism? Or even know how to start doing so? I find it hard to think about reasons why people would go and do terrorist acts, because it means that I have to try and find a way to understand how those minds are working. The only possibility is to start whith what I know, and I only know my mind. (I know my own mind can go into red rage mode, so that doesn't exactly make thinking about it less scary). Of course it is easier when *it* is just declared as *evil* - which seems to be as *godgiven* as anything. *Evil* to me just sounds like an easy explanation that keeps the emotional distance, but it also prevents thinking about solutions, other than *search, kill, destroy*.

September 25, 2002
6:47 pm
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Eve.

You posed this question, "Does anybody discuss how to get to the roots of terrorism?"

Yes, look within - it is as simple and as complex as that!

September 26, 2002
9:08 pm
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eve, i know. but for my own fear and maybe some people wont like to hear it, i cant tell it here. bascially its the great 'I' itself that is the root of hatred. the faith has a lot of hatred for those who dont belong to it..and hatred turns to violence. violence was part of it in its early days as well. i was myself a follower, not anymore. if u wanna know more, i can email u

September 27, 2002
2:57 pm
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Hey guys, check this out (from my fav news site salon)

http://www.salon.com/news/wire.....index.html

500 protestors arrested in DC

September 30, 2002
9:28 pm
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tez, lets hear it from you, what do you think is the root of hatred?

March 18, 2003
1:59 pm
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This is an open letter that novelist Paulo Coelho wrote:

Thank you, great leader George W. Bush.

Thank you for showing everyone what a danger Saddam Hussein represents. Many of us might otherwise have forgotten that he used chemical weapons against his own people, against the Kurds and against the Iranians. Hussein is a bloodthirsty dictator and one of the clearest expressions of evil in today’s world.

But this is not my only reason for thanking you. During the first two months of 2003, you have shown the world a great many other important things and, therefore, deserve my gratitude.

So, remembering a poem I learned as a child, I want to say thank you.

Thank you for showing everyone that the Turkish people and their parliament are not for sale, not even for 26 billion dollars.

Thank you for revealing to the world the gulf that exists between the decisions made by those in power and the wishes of the people. Thank you for making it clear that neither José María Aznar nor Tony Blair give the slightest weight to or show the slightest respect for the votes they received. Aznar is perfectly capable of ignoring the fact that 90% of Spaniards are against the war, and Blair is unmoved by the largest public demonstration to take place in England in the last thirty years.

Thank you for making it necessary for Tony Blair to go to the British parliament with a fabricated dossier written by a student ten years ago, and present this as ‘damning evidence collected by the British Secret Service’.

Thank you for allowing Colin Powell to make a complete fool of himself by showing the UN Security Council photos which, one week later, were publicly challenged by Hans Blix, the chief weapons inspector in Iraq.

Thank you for adopting your current position and thus ensuring that, at the plenary session, the French foreign minister, Dominique de Villepin’s anti-war speech was greeted with applause – something, as far as I know, that has only happened once before in the history of the UN, following a speech by Nelson Mandela.

Thank you too, because, after all your efforts to promote war, the normally divided Arab nations were, for the first time, at their meeting in Cairo during the last week in February, unanimous in their condemnation of any invasion.

Thank you for your rhetoric stating that ‘the UN now has a chance to demonstrate its relevance’, a statement which made even the most reluctant countries take up a position opposing any attack on Iraq.

Thank you for your foreign policy which provoked the British foreign secretary, Jack Straw, into declaring that in the 21st century, ‘a war can have a moral justification’, thus causing him to lose all credibility.

Thank you for trying to divide a Europe that is currently struggling for unification; this was a warning that will not go unheeded.

Thank you for having achieved something that very few have so far managed to do in this century: the bringing together of millions of people on all continents to fight for the same idea, even though that idea is opposed to yours.

Thank you for making us feel once more that though our words may not be heard, they are at least spoken – this will make us stronger in the future.

Thank you for ignoring us, for marginalising all those who oppose your decision, because the future of the Earth belongs to the excluded.

Thank you, because, without you, we would not have realised our own ability to mobilise. It may serve no purpose this time, but it will doubtless be useful later on.

Now that there seems no way of silencing the drums of war, I would like to say, as an ancient European king said to an invader: ‘May your morning be a beautiful one, may the sun shine on your soldiers’ armour, for in the afternoon, I will defeat you.’

Thank you for allowing us – an army of anonymous people filling the streets in an attempt to stop a process that is already underway – to know what it feels like to be powerless and to learn to grapple with that feeling and transform it.

So, enjoy your morning and whatever glory it may yet bring you.

Thank you for not listening to us and not taking us seriously, but know that we are listening to you and that we will not forget your words.

Thank you, great leader George W. Bush.

Thank you very much.

March 18, 2003
4:46 pm
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Thanks, Eve.

We are seeing WWIII in the making!!!

March 19, 2003
8:53 pm
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namaste, master tez. namaste, eve.

thank you, eve, for the piece by paulo coehlo. it is poignant and all too true, i suspect.

master tez, perhaps you are correct in thinking that we are on the verge of wwwiii. but, could it be possible, especially in light of the coehlo piece that this war will not be like the two previous ones? might it be possible that this war will pit the glorious kings of the morning in their armor and flanked by their knights with battle axes, lances, pikes and plumage and equipage with the children of the afternoon? somehow, is it possible, just perhaps, that the open heart will wage a battle with the closed hearts in this 'war.'

could this be the war in which gandhi/king/letellier/tolstoy heart warfare comes to grips with the 'realpolitik' and defeats it. might this be the 'war to end all wars' when the realization of powerlessness among the children of the afternoon in europe can claim kinship with the powerlessness felt by the children of the evening in asia, africa, and south america. in the discovery of that kinship, might it just be possible that among people of goodwill an understanding of our essential oneness might be felt, and in the feeling a change of action might occur? so that this war might be the last war, for the grand kings might have no one left to fight their battles for them?

is that just too hopeful? or might there be a glimmer of something large here? a Mother, come full-term, waiting for the moment of delivery?

March 20, 2003
4:48 pm
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Nikka.

Or perhaps just more of same old, same old.

March 20, 2003
11:21 pm
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tez.

cynicism and anger?

March 21, 2003
6:56 am
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or resignation that human nature and action and emotion haven't changed much from when we threw stones at one another and hit each other with clubs forty thousand years ago?

March 21, 2003
5:08 pm
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Nikka.

Yes ... the latter.

To every action there is an equal and opposite reaction - Sir Isaac Newton.

The law of Karma states the same thing - what goes around, comes back around.

Now, there's talk of bing on the brink of a nuclear war with North Korea ... and of Turkey invading Northern Iraq!!!! Will the US be able to sustain and win a nuclear war with Korea, China and perhaps even Russia? Once the dogs of war have been unleased, who can contain them? Last time Hitler opened the kennel door, this time it was Bush without a shred of evidence to link Iraq to Al Queda and Sept 11th. Even if there were this evidence, using extreme violence to solve issues is foolhardy and gives birth to the worst in human nature.

"Although the world stood up and stopped the bastard, the bitch that bore him is in heat again ..." -Bertolt Brecht. Capitalism - out of greed, "the bitch" and 'sired' by the US - bred Saddam. Now it would kill its own offspring?

If you read Ken Keyes little book, The Hundredth Monkey and understand the message, you will see that we live in precarious times. Will humanity never learn the simple lessons contained therein? Perhaps the prophecies of Nostradamus will herein be fulfilled and planet earth will be cleansed by fire and/or ice.

March 21, 2003
10:03 pm
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ah, namaste, brother tez.

i think it is not the earth needs cleansing, but the human heart. and, i think, that fire and ice are far too harsh to do the cleansing of that vast cauldron of emotion and feeling and activity.

in mindfulness i believe we shall find the cleansing agent for this vast human heart, and the only way the cleansing will begin is with my heart.

you speak of evidence as though it were somehow a meaningful instrument. what evidence did churchill and roosevelt require to understand the horror the the third and grandest reich of the german peoples? and that evidence was readily available to them prior to september of 1939.

what evidence was read by henry kissinger that people were dying by the score and more during the first four or five years of the pinochet regime? better dead than allende supporters?

and now do you, or i, or anyone else truly believe that if there were evidence available that saddam was the second incarnation of jesus would it end this invasion and the slaughter of the children in baghdad? i imagine not, dear brother tez.

my government makes a practice of killing and eating its whelps when they are no longer required. why would the kurds do business with bush and co. or any u.s. government again? they have been used and allowed to be slaughtered twice now since the great patriotic war ended.

where, today, are the montagnards of vietnam and laos? what government of self rule have they in their mountain villages or beneath the stones of their cairns?

whatever became of the somoza family of nicaragua after the last presidente of that name died? and what was the fate of pancho villa?

we kill and eat our children here in the u.s. brother tez. that, perhaps, is the only evidence required to read the leaves at the bottom of this particular cuppa.

and therefore, i cannot place my faith in that government or any other to perform the work required in my own heart. that work is mine.

i spent four years in the u.s. army in the seventies. and since have spent many of the following years caring for and counseling the broken americans who returned from vietnam. we kill and eat those children as well, tez. men who have served and seen horros they never realized americans could see and the sight broke them, their actions broke them. and the same u.s. government that sends their legions so very hurrahed to war now, turns its back on that group of its children. refuses to admit that chemical and biological agents that they were exposed to there are the proximate cause of most of their current suffering. for to make those admissions is to also admit that the u.s. government does what it indicts saddam for having done: killing its own and for simple political gain and/or security.

so it goes, brother tez. and so go i, to tend to the jungle of my own heart, but not, i think with naplam and bombs. rather, with mindfulness and openness.

March 23, 2003
4:35 pm
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Nikka.

Precisely ...

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