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Is Tibet under Chinese oppression?
January 26, 2009
1:06 am
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How would the average US citizen feel under the Chinese jackboot? If the US was invaded, churches burnt to the ground, parsons, priests murdered and nuns raped and tortured and religious freedom suppressed by force as it was/is in Tibet, would the average US citizen be as gullible then as some appear to be here now in swallowing the Chinese propaganda as being truth?

Here is a link that contains a five part rebuttal to all the nonsense being fed into the internet to discredit the Dalai Lama and his cause of seeking autonomy and freedom for his country.

January 26, 2009
5:44 am
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Hey Tez,

This is from the link you posted -
http://www.tibet.net/en/index......rmenuid=11

" ".....I posted a letter in response, explaining that I don't support Tibetan independence, as some accused me of, but that I do support Tibetan freedom as well as Chinese freedom. The next morning, a storm was raging online. Photographs of me had been posted on the Internet with the words "Traitor!" printed across my forehead. Then I saw something really alarming both my parent's citizen ID numbers had been posted. This information could only have come from the Chinese police." "

This is intense propaganda and persecution!! Her parents? That sound like stories of defectors from Communist countries in Europe. I wonder what the government's fear is? Fear of a spiritual leader? Fear of an opressed group of people rising up?

You know, I read that the 14th Dalai Lama fled the country in the late 50s because he feared for his life. With another person saying the same kind of things about the persecution of the government, I can believe it. I can also believe that a government would try to create mistrust of an entire nation, race or ethnic group or religion. I have seen that here in the US with the fear of anything Arabic or Muslim that has grown and festered since Dubya restarted his daddy's war. There has been a lot of propoganda to justify that, to vilify those with a different religion or culture. In the US, before it was Iraq it was Iran. Before that it was Russia, Cuba. Before that, it ws Germany and Japan. And as those struggles went on, we were taught to mistrust those people, not just their government. Creating that mistrust took the focus off what the govt was doing. It's a kind of finger-pointing, a deflection, isn't it?

January 26, 2009
8:08 am
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First of all you have to look into Tibet's history and determine whether or not some of the following:

>> If the US was invaded, churches burnt to the ground, parsons, priests murdered and nuns raped and tortured and religious freedom suppressed by force as it was/is in Tibet

was still done by the Dalai Lamas or not. I've highlighted how thue Shugden followers were crushed for worshipping Shugden and how the Dalai Lama banned the worship of Shugden. This was not religious freedom. Torture under the rule of the Dalai Lamas is a whole different story, recorded by multiple accounts as I've explained.

Thats what you have to determine first. Next, yes, its possible that the Chinese government did use force in whatever they were doing. China isnt exactly an angel in many things, we know that.

Here's an editorial in NYT: China Terrorizes Tibet

So yes,this is China. It probably did all these things and did use force. If you are going to believe these reports though, whats the reason to not believe reports of slavery, torture and serfdom in Tibet when it was being ruled by the Dalai Lamas?

And - I can take part in this thread because this is a new thread and its not the "insights" thread where I was kicked out of.

January 26, 2009
4:24 pm
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So Tez, you ok with me on this thread or you want me to leave? Just making sure. I dont wanna be kicked out of this thread too.

January 26, 2009
11:38 pm
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bevdee

On 26-Jan-09 you wrote:

"There has been a lot of propaganda to justify that, to vilify those with a different religion or culture."

Yes! It is strange that some people haven't the intelligence to question the veracity of the naive propaganda put forward by the Chinese government. One would think that such supposedly intelligent people would both study the refutations on the site linked above and not accept unsubstantiated statements and photos propagated by the Chinese government that have obviously hidden agendas underpinning them.

Perhaps you are right! Bush was probably relying on the same mass unquestioning acceptance of propaganda in the US population to carry his daddy's war on to a worse state than before.

January 27, 2009
12:20 am
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Bevdee.

Further to your post, I was thinking about the very tenets of the Buddha's teachings and the relative austerity in which the Tibetan Buddhist monks live. Take Matthieu Ricard for an example. Here is a PhD graduate in cellular microbiology from the famous Pasteur Institute in France who throws up a lucrative career in that science to be a Buddhist monk for some 30+ years in Tibet. What would make Matthieu subject himself to the rigors on monastic life with the Dalai Lama if such accusations as laid by the Chinese Government were true? Why would hundreds of thousands of Tibetan monks, nuns, and peasants flee over terrible mountain ranges covered in ice just to seek the protection of a murderous, cruel Dalai Lama?

Something is not quite right here is it? Here we have a Buddha whose primary message is first and foremost: "Do no harm to any sentient being", giving a fundamental way of living that is such an antithesis to what the Chinese government says the Dalai Lama is doing. Further, we have a highly intelligent and educated scientist, Matthieu Ricard, serving the Dalai Lama in relative poverty as a monk for no monetary gain, when he can easily ascertain first hand the veracity or otherwise of what the Chinese government propaganda reports.

Methinks only the gullible could swallow such naive 'crapola' as the Chinese government dishes out in order to justify the oppression of the Tibetan people in the eyes of the west. It would appear that their hypocrisy knows no bounds.

January 27, 2009
4:57 pm
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I think the Dalai Lama must seem a terrible threat to the Chinese government. What would they have to lose if they lost control over Tibet?

January 27, 2009
4:58 pm
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Governments try to control masses. They need control so there is not anarchy. Control is maintained by laws, and the threat of prison if the laws are not obeyed.

I have been wondering what would have happened if Martin Luther King, Jr, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X had not been killed. They were certainly a threat to a government that was at the least, content to keep a race of people subverted, opressed. If they had left the country when they knew their lives were in danger, they might still be alive today, leading their people.

At the turn of the last century, Marcus Garvey worked from the US, for the return of "colored people" to Africa. Herbert Hoover tried to find reason to depoot him, but couldn't. The US did not want these freed slaves to leave - even emancipated, they were cheap labor, and because of their race and the US hatered of it, often feared for their lives. Easy to control.

In South Africa, Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years for speaking out against Apartheid. Lessons from the government.

Threat to government - remember McCarthy? The way he went after anyone that might have even brushed up against a communist at a party? Those people were tried and convicted - careers ruined. Lessons in control.

All governments do it. Some are just do it more openly than others. I think the US is not so bad, or maybe we are naive, brainwashed, and so unable to spot it.

January 27, 2009
6:28 pm
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bevdee

On the 27-Jan-09 you wrote:

"What would they have to lose if they lost control over Tibet?"

I remember reading somewhere that Tibet has valuable mineral resources that the Chinese fear losing.

January 27, 2009
6:39 pm
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bevdee

On the 27-Jan-09 you wrote:

"I think the US is not so bad, or maybe we are naive, brainwashed, and so unable to spot it."

I think the present stock market crisis is indicative of just how asleep we all are. The signs have been glaring for years that things are not good.

What is the per capita interest rate that the US is presently paying on their massive borrowings; therein committing future generations of their citizens to penury just to prop up and fund their present and past mismanagement?

I doubt that Australia is in any better position despite reassurances from our erstwhile leaders. We are all mushrooms, kept in the dark and fed bullshit by our respective governments.

China's bullshit is perhaps just a little more obvious to all.

January 27, 2009
7:24 pm
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Can we trust the politicians to run our world without proper unbiased checks and balances?

This according to the 'Freeworld Academy':
"Instead of looking at a recession, we could see a global economic meltdown and maybe something that we have never imagined. This crisis is not a capitalist or a cyclical crisis. It looks like a civilization crisis.

For years, the US and European consumers have lived on credit because they have not yet realized the consequences of the rise of commodities prices and the emergence of new powers. In spite of many warnings, they have not seen the consequences of massive immigration. The globalization is now going alongside with a third-worldization into our own societies.

Moreover, the globalization started in a mood of moral relativism. We have not realized that Capitalism cannot work without a minimum of ethical values. We did not predict the emergence of a new social class only specialized in laundering of dirty money, and management of corruption. As a result, a new society is emerging. It is not the free society, nor the classic authoritarian society. It is the mafia society. How could we trust in such a society? The lack of confidence is the bitter result of these bad changes."

Perhaps we need a return to an ethics based society; that is, one based on wisdom and compassion as espoused by people like the Dalai Lama rather than one based on unbridled greed.

How ethical is the Chinese treatment of the Dalai Lama?

January 27, 2009
7:31 pm
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For the Freeworld Academy's version of "THE ORIGINS OF THE FINANCIAL CRISIS
THE FALL OF THE EMPIRE OF DEBT" click here.

January 27, 2009
8:20 pm
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Hey Tez,

I think you hit on it. Here's what they have to lose. What wouldn't a govt do to protect this wealth?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/fin.....urces.html

China and Britain ready to exploit Tibet's natural resources
Last Updated: 12:27AM BST 31 Jul 2008

Despite political tensions in the country, its huge deposits of gold and other metals are proving too big a temptation for foreign miners, David Eimer reports from Beijing

While Britain's athletes are eyeing gold medals at the Beijing Olympics, British mining companies are setting out to claim a share of China's vast gold deposits. The resource-rich, soon-to-be superpower has been increasingly attracting the attention of foreign miners in recent years. Now, British firms are leading the race to develop the country's mineral deposits.

They are doing so a long way from the shiny new Beijing that will be on display to the world next month. While China has spent an estimated £20m readying the Chinese capital for the Olympics, it is to Tibet, one of China's least-developed regions, that foreign mining companies are now looking. Despite having one of the most hostile environments imaginable, as well as a serious lack of infrastructure, the "roof of the world" is a treasure trove of minerals.

Central China Goldfields (CCG) is the only British miner operating in Tibet. Despite the recent protests against Chinese rule, it is adamant it has made the right decision.

"We're not a political organisation - we don't take sides. But whoever is in charge will develop these deposits," Jeff Malaihollo, the managing director of CCG, told The Sunday Telegraph. "It is how you do it that is important - whether you do it in an environmentally sustainable way and by working with the local community. Ultimately, though, if we don't do it, someone else will."

There is no doubt about that. The once under-developed and under-funded Chinese mining sector is undergoing a revolution that in the next few years seems certain to have a profound effect on commodity markets worldwide. China is on its way to becoming self-sufficient and ultimately one of the world's major exporters of commodities, as vast new mineral deposits are discovered.

Last year, China overtook South Africa to become the world's leading gold producer. Leyshon Resources, listed on Aim and the Australian Securities Exchange, is developing a gold mine in north-eastern Heilongjiang province. "China had a unique combination of untapped exploration potential and established infrastructure," said Paul Atherley, the managing director of Leyshon. "Because of that, China has become the world's largest gold producer in less than a decade."

British mining firms led the way into China. In 1997, the London-based, Aim-listed Griffin Mining became the first foreign company to be granted an exploration licence since the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949.
Now, British companies are operating across China and most are watching developments in Tibet, mining's new frontier.

The Chinese name for Tibet, Xizang or "western treasure house", makes clear how valuable the volatile, politically sensitive region is to China. In 1999, the Chinese embarked on a secret, seven-year geological survey that found 16 major deposits of copper, iron, lead, zinc and other minerals. Tibet is believed to hold as much as 30m-40m tons of copper, 40m tons of lead and zinc and more than a billion tons of high-grade iron ore.

China's steel-hungry construction and car industries imported 386m tons of iron ore in 2007, an 18 per cent rise on 2006, almost half of the world's total imports of iron. That figure will be drastically reduced if the iron in Tibet can be extracted. In all, the total value of Tibet's minerals is estimated at £64.8bn by the Chinese government.

CCG decided in 2006 that Tibet was too tempting an opportunity, despite the threat of protests from groups opposed to China's treatment of the Tibetans. Established in November 2004, in response to the opening up of China's gold sector to overseas companies in 2003, CCG first focused on developing gold projects, including a mine in Inner Mongolia it hopes to have in production by next March. But for the past year, CCG has been exploring for copper in Nimu, close to Tibet's capital, Lhasa.

Nimu lies on the Gangdese copper belt, which runs from the south-western Chinese province of Yunnan all the way to Afghanistan. CCG is still at the exploration stage, but Chinese companies are already constructing mines along this belt, including Yulong, which will be China's largest copper mine. Later this year, the Vancouver-based Continental Minerals is expected to be granted a licence for the first foreign-owned mine in Tibet.

"There's a lot of copper in that belt. Geologically, it's very similar to the Andean belt in South America and it's only a matter of time before more people start hitting copper," says Malaihollo. Like all foreign mining companies in China, CCG has had to set up a joint venture to operate - CCG works with the Sichuan Bureau of Metallurgy and Geological Exploration.

The fact that foreign companies must work with Chinese partners in Tibet has led Tibetan exile and pressure groups, such as the Free Tibet Campaign, to criticise the way such companies have rushed to take advantage of the opening up of mining.

In 2003, the Dalai Lama, the Tibetan spiritual leader, used an open letter to voice his concern, saying: "I appeal to all foreign mining companies and their shareholders thinking about working in Tibet to consider carefully about the ethical values when embarking on such a venture." There have been reports of clashes between Tibetans and Chinese mine workers.

Such opposition has made many British companies wary. "We have looked at projects there but, rightly or wrongly, it does create issues back in the West if you do invest in Tibet. So we are steering clear for the moment," says Roger Goodwin, Griffin Mining's finance director. Instead, it is concentrating on expanding its Caijiaying zinc-gold mine in China's Hebei province.

The precious metals sector is proving the most attractive option for British companies in China. "It's usually easier to get a quicker payback from precious metals development than base metals, which typically have a longer development profile and require a greater capitalisation," says Nigel Clark, chairman of the China International Mining Group (CIMG), a non-profit forum that represents overseas miners.

However, foreign companies are increasingly faced with newly cash-rich companies attracted to the mining sector by the soaring price of commodities. "A lot of real estate companies are getting into mining and the more speculative of them are just throwing money around and we can't compete with that," says Malaihollo.

Overseas companies also have to deal with five different levels of bureaucracy, from the state level, to the provincial, municipal, local and village levels, and many find they do not have the patience to succeed in China.

"One has to understand and respect how business is done in China and appreciate that the only deals to be made in China will be those according to Chinese laws, rules and regulations," says Clark.

But for those companies who are already established, China seems set to be the new El Dorado for years to come.

January 28, 2009
11:36 am
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Then there is the railroad that carries all the miners in the country and the ore out of the country.

http://www.resourceinvestor.co.....elid=22053
Tibet Railway Opens the Gates for Mining
By Interfax-China
28 Jul 2006 at 09:00 AM GMT-04:00

The opening of the new Qinghai-Tibet railway could entice many more mining companies to take a closer look at expansive mineral resources hidden in the mountain province.

SHANGHAI (Interfax-China) -- With the opening of the new Qinghai-Tibet railway earlier this summer, could come a rampage of exploitation by many mining companies chasing the expansive mineral resources hidden in the mountain province.

China's Tibetan Autonomous Region could be the largest mineral resource in the country, with a potential value of more than RMB 1 trillion ($125 billion).

Tibet has the largest chromium and copper deposits in the country, and prospecting has already discovered deposits of 101 other minerals and more than 2,000 more potential mining sites.

The potential of severe environmental impacts on the largely untouched region has even gotten the Dali Lama warning Western mining companies to stay out of the region.

Because of a lack of funds and transportation, few of Tibet's mineral deposits have so far been explored. In Tibet, less than 1% of discovered mines have been prospected, only 15% of mines under commercial operation have completed reconnoiter works, and only 10% of mining companies have passed resources assessment by local authority.

But this was all before the railroad came to town.

The newly opened Qinghai-Tibet railway will have a large impact on the development of the province's mineral resources, to say the least. Production output could surpass RMB 10 billion ($1.25 billion) and account for one-third of the province's GDP within five to 10 years, according to the Xinhua news agency.

During the past couple of years, prospectors and miners from Qinghai, Sichuan, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Jiangxi and Fujian have entered into Tibet. But now, the Qinghai-Tibet railway, opened this summer, can provide less expensive transportation, which will attract more miners.

The Tibetan government will focus on mineral deposits development in areas covering 100 to 200 kilometres far from both sides of the railroad and areas nearby rivers. The Tibetan government plans to apply for RMB 1.5 billion ($187.5 million) in financial support from the central government to use for prospecting for mineral resources in the next four years.

Mining Companies in Tibet

Tibet Mining Co. Ltd. could be one of the mining pioneers in Tibet.

The company operates Luobusa ferrochromium mine in Qusong County Shannan Region, China's largest ferrochromium deposit contributing 80% to the country's total output.

The company owns interests at the Zhabuye Salt Lake in Tibet, which is planned to produce 3,000 tonnes of lithium carbonate this year and 5,000 tonnes next year.

Tibet Mining is now expediting construction and production of the Tingong Copper Mine located on a copper belt in the Yarlung Zangbo River region.

Ni La, an official with the company's project department, told Interfax the copper mine has started trial production with 1,000 tonnes of electrolytic copper annual capacity, although the mine is still being prospected.

She said the company's transportation costs have been reduced by 20% with the opening of the new railway.

"The company's development was restrained before the railway because of the high transportation costs," she said.

Another company, Tibet Yulong Copper Co. Ltd., officially entered Tibet in May 2005.

The company mainly develops copper mines in Yulong, which has proven reserves of 6.24 million tonnes and prospecting reserves of 10 million tonnes.

The first phase of the project is designed to produce 30,000 tonnes of copper, the second phase project will add a capacity of 100,000 tonnes.

But since the opening of the railway, new companies are lining up to get involved in the development of minerals in Tibet.

The Tibet Tianlu Transportation Co. Ltd (Tianlu), a road construction company, wants to set up a joint venture mining company for developing resources in the region.

"The company will benefit from the Qinghai-Tibet Railway and experience of infrastructure construction to pursue mining opportunities in Tibet. We are now talking with Tibet Geology Survey Bureau for prospecting rights," an anonymous Tianlu official said. The company participated in the construction of the railroad.

In addition, the Tibet Summit Industry Co. Ltd, another road construction company, announced at the end of June it has shifted its main business into mining sector. It aims to develop metal resources both in Qinghai and Tibet.

Environmental Consequences

However, with more and more commercial mining projects coming on stream, Tibet is facing serious environmental consequences, in the region that was once mostly untouchable. But the government seems to at least have some understanding of the situation.

Lu Yan, the Chief Engineer of China's largest copper mine the Tibet Yulong Copper Mine, told Interfax that the mine had delayed opening operations because it failed to receive the environment approval from the central government.

Lu said that the central government has acknowledged the likely pollution to Tibet by increasing mining activities and is trying to protect it as much as possible from the very beginning.

Power is another problem.

Tibet Yulong Copper plans to use power from a proposed hydropower plant at the Zhaquhe River. However, if the proposal becomes practical, it needs to build 110kv power transmitting wires from the mine to the plant. The wire will go through a forest and the old trees need to be cut down.

Although the Tibet Forestry Bureau has approved the plan, Lu admitted that it would impact the local environment.

And as part of the preparation for mining, Tibet Yulong Copper has flattened the land for future mining and smelter construction.

Ni admitted the company's mining activities have caused pollution to local environment.

"Anyway, our mines are open pits and they have less impact on environment," she said.

She said the Tibetan government had higher environmental protection requirements for mining projects than other regions in the country.

"The Tibetan government prefers large mining companies to be involved in the exploration of Tibet because they are more aware of environmental protection and have more funds to afford pollution controls."

Environmental protection cost in Tibet accounts for more than 30% of total cost in mining projects, which is higher than mining in other regions of China.

The company has adopted scrap ore recovery systems to prevent the pollution of surrounding environment.

However, she claimed any mining project does hurt environment even if it takes control measures.

Foreign Companies Mining Tibet

Western companies have also begun exploration work and have acquired rights to mineral sites throughout Tibet, sparking protests from western activists.

The annual general meeting of Continental Minerals Corporation [TSXv:KMK], a Canadian firm developing a copper-gold property southwest of Lhasa, was met with protests from 'Free Tibet' activists in June of this year.

And the Dali Lama has also gotten involved.

The Dali Lama urged western mining companies to reconsider their activities in Tibet in a 2003 letter.

"I appeal to all foreign mining companies, and their shareholders, who are thinking about working in Tibet to consider carefully about the ethical values when embarking on such a venture," said the Dali Lama.

Activists have reason to be concerned. In 1996, the head of a monastery was sentenced to six years in prison for protesting increased mining activity near the monastery."

January 28, 2009
12:46 pm
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Every continent or small landmass has experienced the same situation.

There are no indigenous peoples who exist today that haven't been invaded, robbed of their land, natural resources, culture and traditions.

Google it. You can Google mining practice in the USA, South America, Canada, Russia, and that includes drilling for OIL.

There are absolutely no native cultures left that live in their natural state and have control over their traditional lands. They are all assimilated, running or fighting back.

Look what happened to Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Red Cloud, Geronimo......to name a few, and how many more have had their real lives crushed into the dust by systemic genocide, lies, greed, disprespect for their beleif systems, erased from history with lies and just mere ignorance. All for our gain and prosperity.

There's nowhere left to run. They struggle and fight to keep their traditions alive and maintain control over their lands.

Look at Pine Ridge and the Black Hills, what still goes on today in American soil.

In Canada, Oka, Ipperwash and Kettle point to name a few. There are Radium mines that have polluted and destroyed native communities in Northern Canada.

Have the Europeans left Australia?

Have they left SAmerica or NAmerica?

Have they left Indonesia, Borneo, Africa, NWT or Iceland?

There is absolutely no place on this planet that isn't being probed and studied for more mineral resources. Large Corps, Government sponsored or not, are everywhere trying to obtain mineral deposits of all kinds for mass production and Huge profits.

Even our farming practices are being forced into corporate production. Large scale.

And some speak of leaving this planet to find more resources on the Moon, Mars....we're like parasites. War of the Worlds> Were like those aliens, but not as advanced or fast. Good Sci_ Fi can be very prophetic and subliminal. It isn't "them" it's US! It's just like a slow cancer.

(I would like to tell you whats happening to Canada's Farms, the fruit belt in Niagara for example. The best land to produce food especially tender fruits. How the Wine and Housing producers are favoured over growing our own local foods: peaches, plums, cherries, pears....who cares? I do! But I, and the people who are trying to keep our farms alive are loosing the battle. Once the land is gone, it's gone. For how long?)

Have any europeans taken on the spiritual beleif systems of the native peoples in mass numbers? Take only what you need? Treat all living things with dignity and respect? Be gratefull for the fruits of the land including the meat on the table?

Natives had direct contact with what they ate and produced for their daily lives, everything.

We get everything in a package, food, clothes, our "machines"....we don't barter anymore.

What a concept! bartering! Our Governements and Corps don't want us to barter anymore. They then lose control.

We are removed from the full experience and the ability to control our lives and destinies in a huge way.NO we stockpile and hoard. We use Money. We use excessive packaging, and buy products that don't last long, end up in landfill. We shop at Superstores and Walmart. We shop at Dollar stores and buy products manufactured cheaply, and dangerously in China! We support companies that destroy huge tracts of land to get to their resources. Has anyone really sat back and question what their role is in all of this "injustice".

We enable it, support it, and live lives that prevent any turning back. We use various precious metals every day for adornment and in the technologies we use, we support the companies and subsidieries that manufacture and distribute these things and we don't question or stop how they do it? We all just eat it up!

We sign petitions.

We keep electing governments that perpetuate and magnify these problems. We're too scared to vote for Nader, Gore, the Green Party ( I voted Green party and am proud of it!) There aren't any rally usefull people stepping up to be elected.they;ld rather work behind the scnes. The political and corporate environemnt has proved to entrenched to fight? What do we really fear? What are we going to do?

Do any of us live in a manor that prevents this sort of greed and need to prosper?

It's nice to exercise intellect with issues like this, but we'ld be better off examining ourselves, how we live, what we beleive in, what we choose to ignore, what we support and enable for the sake of our cushy lives and to save a dime? What we do to support all of this injustice.

January 28, 2009
2:36 pm
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MsGuided- I agree with what you say about the exploitation of indigenous peoples. The Europeans are still in this country trough their descendents. Their descendents have run this country for generations, each failing to honor the treaties made to the native tribes when they took, I mean "bought" their land. When they forced them out of rich lands to desert lands. Those tribes have adapted to their circumstances as their cultures were diluted, their populations nearly decimated. For years the US government and media portrayed "Indians" as ignorant bloodthirsty, scalping savages, people to be feared, instead of the people that welcomed them, taught them to survive in an unknown land. Portraying them realistically, accurately, wouldn't have served their purpose. Creating a division worked better - they needed the land, and not to pay restitution.

The US govt tried for years to deport Marcus Garvey back to the Carribean , but couldn't find a legal reason to. He was trying to get a homeland established for people of color, since they made substandard wages, and in most geographic areas, couldn't vote. A homeland? Like the Jewish people got Israel? A reservation like some native tribes were granted? It wouldn't have benefitted the US to lose their cheap labor source. I don't think this is unique to the US. If Spiritual leaders, or any kind of leader are at variance with what the goverment wants or needs, they get killed. If not, then exiled. The Dalai Lama's voice is from India, where he refugeed because he feared he would be killed. Since they can't kill him, would the Chinese government resort to other methods?

I posted that because now I am wary of the Chinese govt's agenda. That some of the "info" put out about this Dalai Lama is propoganda by the Chinese government. Propoganda spread in an attempt to discredit him in the eyes of the world because he has been so vocal against mining and the railroad that will impact Tibet and it's culture negatively. It's been kind of interesting going past the rhetoric presented here to learn what's going on in that part of the world. I didn't pay that much attention to the worldwide picture. I mostly consider the insights. Believe it or not, I consider the wisdom contained in writings of Islam and Xtianity, too. I just don't swallow the myths surrounding the religions. I can take what I want. :~) Those religions sure did!!

"It's nice to exercise intellect with issues like this, but we'ld be better off examining ourselves, how we live, what we beleive in," This kind of discussion makes me look at myself. I have to be reminded again and again about my belief system, especially when it pertains to the written word.

January 28, 2009
3:18 pm
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The Dalai Lama and other exiles have been very outspoken against China's policies regarding the exploitation of Tibet and its resources. The railroad seems to be a huge bone of contention between the spiritual leader of Tibet and China, a country that would profit immensely from plundering the wealth of Tibet. The railroad is the bridge. As the Dalai Lama continues to speak against the environmental and cultural impact of the railroad and mining, do the Chinese, in an effort to discredit him- worldwide, retaliate with propoganda?

http://www.theaustralian.news......03,00.html
China rail link destroying Tibet: Dalai Lama
February 01, 2007
Article from: The Australian

"THE Dalai Lama accused Beijing today of using a new railway link to flood Tibet with beggars, prostitutes and the unemployed, destroying its culture and traditions.

“The railway link is a real danger,” said the spiritual leader, who fled to India from Tibet after a failed uprising against Chinese rule in 1959.

“Beggars, handicapped people are coming. Their number is huge. Also jobless people facing difficulty in Chinese mainland are coming to Lhasa,” he told a religious gathering in the Indian city of Mumbai.

The 1,142km rail link opened last July. The world's highest, it passes through spectacular icy peaks on the Tibetan highlands, touching altitudes of 5,000m.

Beijing says the 13-hour connection from China's far-western province of Qinghai to Tibet's capital, Lhasa, will bring economic and social development to the long-isolated region.

But Tibetan exiles - about 80,000 of them live in India - have dubbed the rail link to the “second invasion of Tibet”.

They say it will only increase Chinese migration, dilute Tibetan culture and militarise the region.

The Dalai Lama said Beijing was forcing poor villagers to relocate to Tibet and was also sending uneducated young girls from the countryside to be “inducted as prostitutes” in Lhasa.

“Therefore, that is increasing the danger of AIDS,” he said.

The Dalai Lama said that besides destroying the cultural identity of Tibet, the railway was an “environmental menace” because it was helping China mine at very high altitudes.

“We are very concerned about the environmental impact of the railway link,” he said. "

January 28, 2009
7:23 pm
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BevDee and MsGuided

Many thanks to both of you for very well written and enlightening posts.

It is amazing how Cain is still killing Abel in so many gross and subtle ways and getting away with it.

The Dalai Lama, a good man, is being vilified by the Chinese government who is aided and abetted by Guest_guest here just for standing up for his rights in the world forum.

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