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How Much Visual and Auditory Stimulation is Too Much?
September 16, 2003
10:30 pm
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Ladeska
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I've been doing a bit of research lately regarding what is going on with our children as they are developing and what's going on with alot of adults when it comes to what I call - visual and auditory overload.

This is all brand new territory for us as a civilization. The net with all it's bells and whistles presented us with so much gain, regarding knowledge, communication and "money" that everyone just rushed in, not knowing what the down sides would be... And here we are now just beginning to ask the question that really begs to be asked. What kind of damage is really going on here and how is it affecting our children especially?

This article, for one, is excellent in bringing to the forefront what a child needs at certain ages in order to develop in a well-rounded way. Our technology around us may change, but our brains are basically the same in it's development and in it's operation fundamentally.

I'll post this and then bring more information to this thread. I think it more than suggests that if we wonder "why" there is so much A.D.D. or whatever you want to call a child or adult's inability to really "concentrate" in real life....we might not need to look very much farther than to say - a computer, video games, online chat, 24/7 music through headphones and cell phone communication is not going to suffice for well-rounded brain development.

In fact, quite the contrary. Studies are now being done to suggest that much damage is being done by sensory overload. Not to mention the fact that our emotions are attached to what we do visually...and that requires our bodies to secret alot of seratonin...which means that - that just "might" have something to do with kids ending up having problems with depression at an earlier and earlier age. If you're low on seratonin in your body, you're going to be in depression.

I'll post an article about this as well, but just wanted to bring this information out here so that we can discuss it.

************************

FAILURE TO CONNECT -
by Jane M. Healy, Ph.D; Simon and Schuster, 1998

Doing It Right When the Time is Right: Chapter 7: Cybertots: Technology and
the Preschool Child

Copies available in the School Library
or Order your copy from Amazon.com
The next couple of chapters in Dr. Healy¹s book summarize the best recommendations available right now for technology and children. The focus of chapter 7 is on children during the early childhood years, and the focus of 8 is on elementary and secondary aged children. Dr. Healy becomes very clear about the use of computers with young children in chapter 7. ³Time spent with computers in the early years not only subtracts from important developmental tasks but may also entrench bad learning habits, leading to poor motivation and even symptoms of learning disability...I have recently come to believe that computers-at least as they are currently being used-are not necessary or even desirable in the lives of most children under age seven (with the exception, of course, of children suffering from certain handicaps)...I believe we need a reality check.² (pp. 205-6)

During the critical stage of development between birth and the second birthday, children need to spend a great deal of time exploring their world. The child¹s senses are developing and it is very important for them to be able to move freely in their environment. Animal studies have shown that overstimulating any of the senses during this period of development causes lasting negative effects on attention and learning. Toddlers need to be shielded from both television and computers so that the overstimulation of the sense of vision doesn¹t interfere with critical brain development.

>From age two until seven there are seven different types of learning that may be distorted by too much electronic stimulation. First, children need to learn in a social context, through loving, verbal contacts with others. Children in this stage of development have very limited understanding of the difference between reality and fantasy and often believe that computers have much more personality than is true. Researchers at fourteen different universities have found ³that children¹s intelligence, academic success, and emotional stability were determined primarily by the personal and language interaction they had with adults.² (p. 208)

Second, children need to be learning through using all of their senses. As discussed in chapter 5, excessive visual stimulation may cause increases in the use of the right frontal lobe which can cause social withdrawal. Young children must spend their time listening, looking, touching and moving. Third, the early years are a time for learning how to learn. Children need experience managing their own minds which doesn¹t happen when their interactions are with preprogrammed machines. They are busy learning to regulate their emotions, problem-solve, be flexible, motivated and persistent, focus attention, develop social skills, body rhythm and coordination, and build their ability to use their own imagination.

Learning to pay attention is the fourth type of learning that can be seriously and negatively affected by the distractions of graphics and special effects. Young children are also prone to click the mouse impulsively, which is commonly rewarded with some response from the computer and often this contributes to attention problems. The fifth skill is learning visual imagery and memory. The working memory develops through the use of visual imagery throughout childhood and adolescence and is described as the ability to juggle a number of ideas and/or thoughts at a time. Adults help children develop these skills through having them imagine the pictures to go with a story, or review a well-known story such as Cinderella by making a ³movie in their mind². These skills are not developed by the television or the computer, as the pictures are provided by the machine.

The sixth skill being developed is the ability to think logically using if/then statements. ³Psychologists have concluded that, along with requisite brain changes, they need physical experience of action sequences that they themselves control...thus, the years between three and four may be a particularly bad time to introduce an opaque and arbitrary electronic Œtoy¹ into the child¹s world....progress requires interaction with human beings and human emotions.² (pp. 212-3) The final skill is learning new symbol systems. Young children need to internalize meaning before learning symbols. For example, they needed repeated experiments with real objects to learn about the quantities 1 through 10. Time spent in ³drill² on a computer is not based on the realities that small children require for real learning to occur.

By age seven, limited computer time may have value but ³most thoughtful professionals I (Dr. Healy) have interviewed agree on one particular philosophy about computer use. It is, simply: If the computer can accomplish the task better than other materials or experiences, we will use it. If it doesn¹t clearly do the job better, we will save the money and use methods that have already proven their worth.² (pp. 217-8)

It is critical that young children learn how to play and be playful. They are easily hooked on the television and the computer and while the quiet may appear to be a blessing, it is not. Spontaneous play occurs across cultures and a striking correlation has been found between the period of greatest playfulness and the time when brain connections are actively being made. ³Play and spontaneous physical activity have other important functions in early life, including stimulation of the cerebellum, which coordinates motor activity, balance, and higher cognitive functions. In early childhood the child is naturally impelled to jump, hop, spin, and interact with playmates. (Organized sports do not qualify as Œplay¹ in the same sense because they are structured by adults and lack spontaneity.) Because the cerebellum is integral to many mental skills, restricting physical play may have serious long-term consequences.²
(p. 223) Dr. Healy quotes a preschool teacher who stated ³Dramatic (pretend) play is the most important thing a child can do at this age, but my students have already had so much television and computer at home that it takes them a while to learn to play imaginatively.² (pp. 224-5)

Finally, David Elkind states that to enter school successfully children should be able to ³express themselves, listen, follow directions, start a task and bring it to completion themselves before jumping off to another project, and cooperate.² (p. 242)

September 16, 2003
10:40 pm
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FRONTAL LOBES (or Prefrontal cortex): Located at forehead above eyes.

The frontal lobes receive input from various neocortical regions including the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus, and the parietal association cortex. The prefrontal orbital cortex, however, receives fibres from the pars magnocellularis of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, and from the mesencephallic recticular formation as well as from limbic structures. In this way the prefrontal cortex appears to receive information about all sensory modalities and also about motivational and emotional states of the individual. There are strong efferent connections to the motor and pre motor cortex, the basal ganglia and the caudate nucleus. Orbital-prefrontal regions send fibres into the hypothalamus, subthalamus, septum, mesencephalon and the pons.[11.]

Functions associated with the frontal lobes:

Conscious thought
Concentration
Perseverance
Judgement
Attention span
Impulse control - self monitoring and supervision
Problem solving
Organisation
Critical thinking
Forward thinking
Ability to feel and express emotions
Empathy
Decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex is a finding often cited in people who have cognitive difficulty, such as in schizophrenia or major depression. Abnormal frontal activity is a major factor in ADD & ADHD. The prefrontal cortex is involved in mediating concentration, impulse control and critical thinking.

At the top of the brain, in the middle of the frontal lobes is an area of the brain termed the "cingulate gyrus". It is the part of the brain which allows you to shift your attention from thing to thing, to move from idea to idea, to see the options in life. Feelings of safety and security have also been attributed to this part of the brain. The term that possibly best relates to this part of the brain is 'cognitive flexibility'.

Functions of the Cingulate System:

Allows shifting of attention
Helps the mind move from idea to idea
Allows the mind to see options
Cognitive flexibility (helps you go with the flow)
Adaptability
Ability to cooperate
Increased activity in the top, middle portions of the frontal lobes is frequently cited as a finding in obsessive-compulsive disorder, a condition where people become "stuck" on certain thoughts or behaviors. Aggressive people often become "stuck" on real or imagined injustices and think about them over and over. Oppositional, and addictive behaviours are also evident. Chronic pain, eating disorders and road rage appear to accompany cingulate dysfunction.

September 16, 2003
10:43 pm
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Ladeska
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Katherine Fite's research ongoing now....

Fite’s research is concerned with how the brain receives, processes, and interprets visual information transmitted from the retina of the eye. Visual stimulation plays a major role in perception and guidance of behaviors. In addition, light stimulation influences biological rhythms, moods, and emotions, although relatively little is known about how such effects take place in the brain. She is studying a direct pathway of nerve fibers from the retina to a region in the brainstem known as the "dorsal raphe nucleus." Neurons in this cell group produce much of the neurotransmitter, serotonin, that has widespread effects throughout the brain and nervous system.

September 16, 2003
10:51 pm
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Bionic Youth: Too Much Information?

Today’s kids are the most wired in history. What does that mean for their brains?

By Fred Guterl
NEWSWEEK INTERNATIONAL

CHOI MUN GWON, 13, sits intently in front of a monitor, leading wizards and warriors in battle against the forces of hell in the action game Diablo. When he isn’t at PC Bang, he’s usually home messaging his friends on their computers or their cell phones. “My parents don’t mind,” he says. “I don’t have that much homework yet.”

The world that today’s kids inhabit is diverging sharply from the one their parents grew up in. Unlike other generation gaps, this one doesn’t revolve around mores, fashion or pop culture so much as technology. Kids have never been more wired. Not just in South Korea but throughout the world, childhood relationships are made or broken with a few strokes of a cell-phone keypad. Skills are being acquired less from books than from videogames. And the senses are bombarded with information that flows from every direction at an ever-quickening pace.

Indeed, kids are not merely wired; they’re also constantly being rewired, as information providers explore new ways of delivering information. Text messaging via mobile phones was the new thing in Europe a few years ago; now Korean kids are using their phones to download songs at $1 a pop. Cameras are becoming standard items on phones and personal digital assistants; even some clothes contain gadgets like microphones and MP3 players.

Is this a good thing? Is the stimulation of new media preparing kids for a future high-tech world—or turning them into antisocial, superficial dolts? There are no definitive answers. Only in the past few years have scientists begun to plumb children’s brains to see what goes on during the hours they spend engrossed in videogames or surfing the Web. What seems clear is that children are developing a far different set of skills than they had before. They are growing adept at handling visual information and multitasking. And the messaging free-for-all may actually help some kids overcome childhood awkwardness in relating to their peers.

Of all the gimmicks that have come and gone, young people are being carried by two main currents of technology. One can be loosely called videogames, and it includes a broad range of visually oriented experiences ranging from benign puzzles to intense, sometimes violent action games. The second current is messaging: anything from simple e-mail to Internet chat rooms to text messaging on cell phones to the exchange of images and voice recordings. Both forces are reshaping the experiences of millions of children around the world.

Ever since Atari started selling Pong in the 1970s, videogames have steadily increased in power and allure, to the point where they now rival cinema in visual impact. In recent years, advanced graphics have made their visual punch available on a wide range of devices, from small handheld gadgets to game consoles like Nintendo’s GameCube and Microsoft’s Xbox. And the devices are increasingly linked to high-speed broadband Internet connections—even wireless ones—giving players access to a whole cybercommunity of gamers.

Jonathan Wendel could serve as a poster boy for this videogame generation. Wendel first picked up a Nintendo control pad when he was 5. A year later, in 1987, his father brought home a personal computer. He started running flight-simulator software and spent hours absorbed in mastering aerial maneuvers. By the time he was a teenager, he had gotten into shoot-’em-up action games like Duke Nukem and Castle Wolfenstein. “My parents hated me playing videogames all the time,” he says. “They grounded me constantly.” When he was 18 he entered his first professional videogame competition. Since then the native of Kansas City, Missouri has won three world championships and taken home $150,000 in prize money. To keep his skills sharp, he spends more than 40 hours a week behind the monitor.

What happens to an impressionable young brain when it spends so much time exposed to a fast-paced visual medium? The short answer is: it adapts. The brain is plastic, which is to say it changes readily in response to stimuli. Cognitive neuroscientist Daphne Bevalier began to suspect that videogames were altering the minds of young people about two years ago, after she gave some students at the University of Rochester in New York a test designed to measure their visual perceptions. The one student who did particularly well turned out to be an avid videogame player.

Intrigued, Bevalier put together two groups of students—avid gamers and non-gamers—and, over the course of a few semesters, gave both a series of computerized visual-perception tests. On average, the videogame players scored 30 percent better than nonplayers. These results alone wouldn’t indicate brain plasticity; the gamers might simply have had better inherent visual skills. To eliminate this possibility, Bevalier formed two other groups of nonplayers; one trained for an hour a day shooting enemy soldiers in the action game Medal of Honor while the other played the more sedate puzzle game Tetris. After 10 days the Medal of Honor trainees scored higher than both the nonplayers and their Tetris colleagues. Bevalier concluded that action-packed videogames enhance the “capacity of visual attention and its spatial distribution.”

Many questions remain: why are videogames so efficient at enhancing visual performance? Is it because they are graphically compelling, or because they overload the senses? To what extent do emotional responses—danger, violence, a sense of challenge—play a role? There’s no doubt that emotions have a lot to do with the appeal of videogames. From the brain’s point of view, gaming is largely a visual task, and as such it gets processed mainly in the right hemisphere. What worries scientists is that the right-lobe visual circuits have a fast track to the emotions. If you read about a violent event, the information is filtered through your more rational, analytical left hemisphere. Richard Restak, a neurologist at George Washington University and the author of “The New Brain,” argues that visual media like videogames and television don’t get tempered in this way.

According to a study by psychologist Craig Anderson of the University of Missouri-Columbia, an overload of emotion-charged imagery can increase antisocial behavior. In a study of college students published in 2000 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, he found that playing violent games like Mortal Kombat correlated strongly to aggressive personalities, poor academic performance and delinquency.

To be sure, not all videogames are violent. Games like the Sims, in which kids create fictional families and then watch them live out their mundane lives, may actually foster problem-solving and role-playing skills. Such games favor not the brain’s visual circuits but its pre-frontal cortex, which serves as a command center, putting things in context. “Videogames can either stimulate brain development or stifle brain development, and the difference between the two has to do with the design of the games,” says Trevor Neilson, a World Economic Forum Global Leader for Tomorrow and executive vice president of the Casey Family Foundation.

Few studies have addressed the impact of games on the imagination. “It remains to be seen whether autonomous imagination can be stimulated by computers, or whether it’s limited by the fact that you have to sit in front of a screen with a mouse,” says Jerome Singer, professor of psychology at Yale University, who is working on a book about the impact of electronic media on kids’ imaginations. There’s even some evidence that gaming may make kids smarter—or at least test better. James R. Flynn, a philosophy professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand, says that videogames may have contributed to an increase in scores on IQ tests that measure quickness in solving pattern-recognition problems. This doesn’t correlate to more street smarts or higher academic performance in kids. If anything, it probably means they’re better suited to being fighter pilots or air-traffic controllers. That’s not a bad thing, but it’s nothing to get too excited about either.

The most unambiguous benefits of new technology may lie in its most frivolous applications. Kids have always immersed themselves in endless conversations with their peers, and they’ll use any technology to get an edge in this pursuit. The current cutting edge includes chat rooms and instant messaging, often via mobile phones. Analia Miyagi, a bubbly 17-year-old from Buenos Aires, logs on for two or three hours a day to stay in touch with her friends from school. “We all connect from our houses and have fun together,” she says. “If I forget to say something to one of my friends, I can find her in the chat.”

Scientists have just begun to study the effect messaging technologies are having on kids’ social development. Right now, they’re still trying to catalog behaviors. Researchers at the Children’s Digital Media Center at Georgetown University set up a group of 10- to 12-year-olds in a “virtual environment” and let them interact with each other. To their surprise, the kids chose avatars that pretty closely matched their real selves—same gender, same general characteristics. “Boys did a lot of moving quickly, changing scenes and emotions a lot,” says psychologist Sandra Calvert. “Girls wrote a lot, much more than boys.”

The common view of technology-obsessed kids as antisocial loners may be ready for revision. In a study of seventh and 10th graders, UCLA researchers found no relationship between Internet use and loneliness, depression or social anxiety. That didn’t surprise Elisheva Gross, a researcher with the Children’s Digital Media Center at UCLA. “From the perspective of developmental psychology, and particularly our study of intimacy, well-being depends on close interactions with others,” says Gross. The technology encourages kids to keep in touch with real-world peers, not to retreat into an isolated fantasy world.

Some kids used the technology to interact with classmates they otherwise wouldn’t know. Gross recalls one teenage girl who talked about how great it was to chat online with the most popular girl at her school—particularly since they didn’t normally hang out together during the day. And when it came to approaching the opposite sex, instant messaging was a whole lot less stressful than getting up the nerve to speak to somebody in the school cafeteria. “Kids may be able to use the Internet as a way to explore romantic relationships, flirting and even just exploring friendships with the opposite sex in a way that wasn’t available before,” says Gross.

Of course, the ability to pop off notes to anybody—especially behind the veil of anonymity—can be a terrifying freedom. According to Miyagi, the cyber social life is tricky to navigate. Chat rooms, she says, are “full of liars” and “very superficial. There’s nobody who tells the truth, ever.”

Perhaps the issue is less what young people do with new media than the demands it makes on their senses. Multitasking—the practice of performing several tasks simultaneously—is a crucial skill for survival in today’s world. Whereas television used to run “crawls” of information at the bottom of the screen only during emergencies, they’re now used routinely. Instant messaging can involve keeping several streams of conversation going at the same time.

But brain research shows that the mind doesn’t switch its attention from one thing to the next instantaneously; in fact, it takes about seven tenths of a second. David Meyer, a psychologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, had adults switch back and forth between doing math problems and recognizing shapes. The subjects took longer to do both tasks simultaneously than they would have taken to do one at a time—and they did them less accurately.

It’s not clear what role electronic media may play in the near-epidemic proportions of attention deficit disorder among school-age children. Does the youthful brain raised on a diet of overstimulation adapt, and even thrive? Yes and no. “Kids are getting better at paying attention to several things at once,” says Patricia Greenfield, director of the Children’s Digital Media Center at UCLA. “But there is a cost, in that you don’t go into any one thing in as much depth.”

September 16, 2003
10:58 pm
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The consistent finding of neuropsycholphysiological studies of depression is that abnormally low levels of neurotransmitters - mainly norepinepherine, dopamine and serotonin - appear to be linked to depression. Other findings correlate with an imbalance of the thalamocortical circuiting and feedback and gating circuits. In the depressed state the overactive circuits represent autonomous and exaggerated activity of prefrontal or basal ganglia circuits that code for negative imagery of self and the larger world.

Work as early as 1937 (Papez, 1937) suggested that reverberations through the limbic system were responsible for generating emotional activity. And subsequent studies as well as PET investigations in 1992 by Drevets et.al., found that increased blood flow through the amygdala may be a trait marker for depressive disorders whether depression is manifest or not. Drevets, in comparing his findings to other neurophysiological data available, suggests that the functioning of a prefrontal-amygdala-medial dorsal thalmic circuitry is overactive in a depressed individual's brain. CT studies by Schlegal & Ketzschmar in 1987 cited ventricular enlargement in unipolar as well as bipolar depression.

LeDoux, Romanski & Xagoraris (1989) found that there are correlations between the Automatic Nervous System (ANS) balance and depression, citing that different patterns of ANS arousal and different emotions correspond. This also corresponds to endocrine system dysfunction. (See the Article -The Relationship between Vital Energy, The Brain and the Human Nervous System for a more information of the implications of ANS dysfunctions)

A study by Starkstein & Robinson in 19975., suggests that dysfunction of the frontal lobes (the executive and decision making area of the brain) may produce overinhibition of dorsal brain areas, thus abnormally reducing motor, instinctive, intellectual, and emotional output,

*******and further studies in this area by Mayberg6., suggest that recovery from depression will involve inhibition of the overactive ventral regions (amygdal/limbic system) and normalisation of the frontodorsal hypofunction.**********

EEG findings in studies of genetic unipolar depressives show that depressed persons display a disorganised atypical sleep pattern which skips a 'level' of deep sleep and prominent delta and theta waves (which are sleep waves) in the waking state 7.. So we may conclude that the depressed person's brainwave activity in sleep is invaded by 'waking' waves and the reverse in the waking state.

The Brain-Thyroid axis has also been implicated in the biology of depression and the blunting of the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotropin releasing hormone and the elevation of serum T4 are the most consistent findings.

Recent studies suggest that closed head injury of the coup-contra coup type involving axonal shear contribute significantly to depression via reduction of serotonin receptors and disruption of the connections between dorsal and ventral areas of the brain.

Many studies have found relationships between the type of food we ingest and depression. One of the most common causes of depression is in fact food allergies, and another is hypoglycemia (low blood/sugar)11..

Heredity (genetics) is a significant factor which can not be overlooked. In up to 50% of people suffering depression, one or both parents also experienced depression.

September 17, 2003
1:49 pm
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Digital Crack

Research: video games decrease brain activity

Prolonged time playing video games could cause people to lose concentration, get angry easily and have trouble associating with others, a Japanese professor's research has suggested.

In a survey conducted by Akio Mori, a professor in Nihon University's College of Humanities and Sciences, it was found that the longer people spent playing video games, the less activity they showed in the prefrontal region of their brains, which governs emotion and creativity.

And brain activity in the people who continually played games did not recover in the periods when they weren't playing games, the research showed.

Mori analyzed the brain waves of 240 people aged between 6 and 29, separating the beta waves that indicate liveliness and degree of tension in the prefrontal region of the brain, and alpha waves, which often appear when the brain is resting.

He divided the brain activity of participants into four categories -- naming the activity normal, visual, half-videogame, and videogame.

The beta waves in the brains of those in the normal category, who rarely played video games, were always stronger than the alpha waves their brains emitted, and little change was shown when they started playing a game.

Those in the half-videogame category, who spent between one and three hours each day playing games for three to four days a week, had roughly equal alpha and beta wave activity before they started playing a game. However, once they started playing, the beta waves rapidly decreased, falling below the level of the alpha waves.

Beta wave activity in people in the videogame group, who spent between two and seven hours each day playing games, was constantly near zero even when they weren't playing, showing that they hardly used the prefrontal regions of their brains.

Many of the people in this group told researchers that they got angry easily, couldn't concentrate, and had trouble associating with friends.

"I want people to be aware of the quality of games and the time young people spend playing them during their earlier years when sentiment develops," Mori said of the results.

Mori said the research showed that only the nerve circuits of sight and motion moved when people played videogames, causing a drop in the process of thought.

The research also found that after continued time playing videogames, a decrease in prefrontal brain activity became chronic. Those in the visual group, who were used to visual stimulation, such as from television, easily developed videogame-type brains.

"Many videogames stir up tension and a feeling of fear, and there is concern that this could have an effect on the autonomic nerves," Mori said. "During childhood, playing outside with friends, not videogames, is the best option."

The results of the research were expected to be announced at a meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in the United States in autumn. (Mainichi Shimbun, July 8, 2002)

September 17, 2003
2:24 pm
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Television: Opiate of the Masses

By Wes Moore

T.V. -
It satellite links
Our United States of Unconsciousness
Apathetic therapeutic and extremely addictive
The methadone metronome pumping out
150 channels 24 hours a day
You can flip through all of them
And still there's nothing worth watching
— Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy,
Television, Drug of a Nation

Alright junkies, I know you don’t like staring at long strands of motionless text, and I know it’s a struggle for you to analyze and comprehend the meaning of complex sequences of words. But if you give me just a few minutes, I will let you in on a little secret that marketers and governments have been relying on for decades. That television you watch every day, your secret best friend, is an addictive opiate, and not only that, it’s one of the most potent mind control devices ever produced. And I’m not just basing this on intuition. I have the neurological evidence to prove it.

Although the definitions are vague and somewhat misleading, the word “addiction” usually refers to a psychological or physical dependence on a particular experience that must be repeated in order for a person to be comfortable. Usually, we think about this in terms of chemical addiction, which occurs when the addict’s chemical of choice reorganizes the nervous system so that it requires the presence of that chemical to operate smoothly.

Of course, not all addictions are chemical. Any behavior that leads to a pleasurable experience will be repeated, especially if that behavior requires little work. Psychologists call this pattern “positive reinforcement.” This is what we mean, technically speaking, by addiction. In this sense, television certainly fits into the category of an addictive agent.

When you watch TV, brain activity switches from the left to the right hemisphere. In fact, experiments conducted by researcher Herbert Krugman showed that while viewers are watching television, the right hemisphere is twice as active as the left, a neurological anomaly.1 The crossover from left to right releases a surge of the body’s natural opiates: endorphins, which include beta-endorphins and enkephalins. Endorphins are structurally identical to opium and its derivatives (morphine, codeine, heroin, etc.). Activities that release endorphins (also called opioid peptides) are usually habit-forming (we rarely call them addictive). These include cracking knuckles, strenuous exercise, and orgasm. External opiates act on the same receptor sites (opioid receptors) as endorphins, so there is little difference between the two.

In fact, strenuous exercise, which produces the nominal “runner's high”—a release of endorphins that flood the system, can be highly addictive, to the point where “addicts” who abruptly stop exercising experience opiate-withdrawal symptoms, namely migraine headaches. These migraines are caused by a dysfunction in opioid receptors, which are accustomed to the steady influx of endorphins.

Indeed, even casual television viewers experience such opiate-withdrawal symptoms if they stop watching TV for a prolonged period of time. An article from South Africa’s Eastern Province Herald (October 1975) described two experiments in which people from various socio-economic milieus were asked to stop watching television. In one experiment, several families volunteered to turn off their TV’s for just one month. The poorest family gave in after one week, and the others suffered from depression, saying they felt as though they had “lost a friend.” In the other experiment, 182 West Germans agreed to kick their television viewing habit for a year, with the added bonus of payment. None could resist the urge longer than six months, and over time all of the participants showed the symptoms of opiate withdrawal: increased anxiety, frustration, and depression.

The signs of addiction are all around us. The average American watches over four hours of television every day, and 49% of those continue to watch despite admitting to doing it excessively. These are the classic indicators of an addict in denial: addicts know they're doing harm to themselves, but continue to use the drug regardless.

Recent studies on laboratory rats show that opioid-receptor stimulants induce addictive behaviors. The evidence is conclusive: all opioids are addictive! Even the ones your body produces naturally. The television set works as a high-tech drug delivery system, and we all feel its effects. The question is, can an addiction to television be destructive? The answer we receive from modern science is a resounding “Yes!”

First of all, when you're watching television the higher brain regions (like the midbrain and the neo-cortex) are shut down, and most activity shifts to the lower brain regions (like the limbic system). The neurological processes that take place in these regions cannot accurately be called “cognitive.” The lower or reptile brain simply stands poised to react to the environment using deeply embedded “fight or flight” response programs. Moreover, these lower brain regions cannot distinguish reality from fabricated images (a job performed by the neo-cortex), so they react to television content as though it were real, releasing appropriate hormones and so on. Studies have proven that, in the long run, too much activity in the lower brain leads to atrophy in the higher brain regions.

It is interesting to note that the lower/reptile/limbic brain correlates to the bio-survival circuit of the Leary/Wilson 8 Circuit Model of Consciousness. This is our primal circuit, the base “presence” that we normally associate with consciousness. This is the circuit where we receive our first neurological imprint (the oral imprint), which conditions us to advance toward anything warm, pleasurable and/or protective in the environment. The bio-survival circuit is our most infantile, our most primal way of dealing with reality.

A person obsessed with the pursuit of physical pleasure is probably fixated on this circuit; in fact the Freudians believed an opium addiction was an attempt to return to the womb. We could logically deduce that such addictions occur when higher brain functions are anesthetized and the newly dominant lower brain seeks out pleasure at any cost. Taking this into account, television is like a double edged sword: not only does it cause the endocrine system to release the body’s natural opiates (endorphins), but it also concentrates neurological activity in the lower brain regions where we are motivated by nothing but the pursuit of pleasure. Television produces highly functional, mobile “bio-survival robots.”

Herbert Krugman’s research proved that watching television numbs the left brain and leaves the right brain to perform all cognitive duties. This has some harrowing implications for the effects of television on brain development and health. For one, the left hemisphere is the critical region for organizing, analyzing, and judging incoming data. The right brain treats incoming data uncritically, and it does not decode or divide information into its component parts.

The right brain processes information in wholes, leading to emotional rather than intelligent responses. We cannot rationally attend to the content presented on television because that part of our brain is not in operation. It is therefore unsurprising that people rarely comprehend what they see on television, as was shown by a study conducted by researcher Jacob Jacoby. Jacoby found that, out of 2,700 people tested, 90% misunderstood what they watched on television only minutes before. As yet there is no explanation as to why we switch to the right brain while viewing television, but we do know this phenomenon is immune to content.

For a brain to comprehend and communicate complex meaning, it must be in a state of “chaotic disequilibrium.” This means that there must be a dynamic flow of communication between all of the regions of the brain, which facilitates the comprehension of higher levels of order (breaking conceptual thresholds), and leads to the formation of complex ideas. High levels of chaotic brain activity are present during challenging tasks like reading, writing, and working mathematical equations in your head. They are not present while watching TV. Levels of brain activity are measured by an electroencenograph (EEG) machine. While watching television, the brain appears to slow to a halt, registering low alpha wave readings on the EEG. This is caused by the radiant light produced by cathode ray technology within the television set. Even if you're reading text on a television screen the brain registers low levels of activity. Once again, regardless of the content being presented, television essentially turns off your nervous system.

In addition to its devastating neurological effects, television can be harmful to your sense of self-worth, your perception of your environment, and your physical health. Recent surveys have shown that 75% of American women think they are overweight, likely the result of watching chronically thin actresses and models four hours a day.

Television has also spawned a “culture of fear” in the U.S. and beyond, with its focus on the limbic brain-friendly sensationalism of violent programming. Studies have shown that people of all generations greatly overestimate the threat of violence in real life. This is no shock because their brains cannot discern reality from fiction while watching TV.

Television is bad for your body as well. Obesity, sleep deprivation, and stunted sensory development are all common among television addicts.

So I hope we’ve firmly established that television is an addictive drug, one that is no better than opium, heroin, or any other opiate. Television is just as (and possibly even more) harmful to the body-brain as every other drug. But there’s one big difference. All other drugs apparently pose a threat to the established social order. Television, however, is a drug that is actually essential to maintaining the social infrastructure. Why? Because it brainwashes consumers to throw money at the gaping void of their meaningless, terror-filled lives. And by brainwashed, I mean they’ve been hypnotized using very subtle and established techniques which, when coupled with television’s natural effects on brain waves, make for the most ambitious psychological engineering ruse ever concocted.

Psychophysiologist Thomas Mulholland found that after just 30 seconds of watching television the brain begins to produce alpha waves, which indicates torpid (almost comatose) rates of activity. Alpha brain waves are associated with unfocused, overly receptive states of consciousness. A high frequency alpha waves does not occur normally when the eyes are open. In fact, Mulholland’s research implies that watching television is neurologically analogous to staring at a blank wall.

I should note that the goal of hypnotists is to induce slow brain wave states. Alpha waves are present during the “light hypnotic” state used by hypno-therapists for suggestion therapy.

When Mulholland’s research was published it greatly impacted the television industry, at least in the marketing and advertising sector. Realizing viewers automatically enter a trance state while watching television, marketers began designing commercials that produce unconscious emotional states or moods within the viewer. The aim of commercials is not to appeal to the rational or conscious mind (which usually dismisses advertisements) but rather to implant moods that the consumer will associate with the product when it is encountered in real life. When we see product displays at a store, for instance, those positive emotions are triggered. Endorsements from beloved athletes and other celebrities evoke the same associations. If you’ve ever doubted the power of television advertising, bear this in mind: commercials work better if you’re not paying attention to them!

An addictive mind control device . . . what more could a government or profit-driven corporation ask for? But the really sad thing about television is that it turns

everyone into a zombie, no one is immune. There is no higher order of super-intelligent, nefarious beings behind this. It’s the product of our very human desire to alter our state of consciousness and escape the hardships of reality.

While AdBusters has their highly ineffectual “TV Turnoff Week,” I’d like to announce a campaign of my own. Starting next week, we will celebrate what I like to call TV Pawn-Off Week. I encourage you all to sell your televisions, and use the money to buy some books.

We’re living in a Brave New World, only it’s not so brave, or even that new. In fact, it’s starting to look more and more like the Dark Ages, with the preliterate zombie masses obeying the authority of the new clergy: Regis Philbin and Jerry Springer.

From: http://www.cognitiveliberty.or.....5JCL59.htm

September 17, 2003
5:26 pm
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Ladeska.

Having been a teacher who tried hard to compete with the many hi-tech stimuli that offer instant reward without any real effort, I became very frustrated by the ever shortening attention span of adolescents and young adults.

After a valiant effort to compete by trying to introduce novel teaching strategies across the board and failing, I chose voluntary early retirement rather that to continue taking my pay under false pretenses. Quite a few of my colleagues did the same. Those who remained teaching in the institute, simply fudged the assessments in order to appease the higher eschelon's desires to maintain the facade of achieving the educational goals.

The extent of the illiteracy and innumeracy bears bleak testimony to the every decreasing standards demanded of pupils by our school system that I am sure is similar to yours in the States. The hoary old argument that computers and calculators do all the work, therein rendering such skills redundant, is wearing a little thin.

When a student fails to see anything wrong with placing an order for 120,876 cubic meters of concrete just to construct a short 2.5 meter long garden path, because his miskeyed calculator told him that this is the volume required, then I see disaster ahead for the coming generations!

Integrity is now a quaint old word that is of little relevance or use in the vocabulary of our society today - our political and educational institutions are no exception.

A high price will have to be paid for our myopic vision obscured so much by economic rationalism. We are seeing some of the 'bills' appearing already.

September 17, 2003
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Yes, indeedy!!! I hear ya, Tez. It just breaks my heart. I've heard many a commentary like yours. I have a dear friend here who is just brilliant. He's my chiropractor and a very intuitive one, fixes me right up! But he used to be a science teacher and I guess his classes were bursting at the seams because he used to make learning SO MUCH fun! He'd blow up his classroom every now and then but HEY, the kids loved it! He'd take them out on field trips and just have a grand ole time...."teaching".
He's very funny, but very, very smart and those kids LOVED him!!

Alas though.......it came down to parents who just were not dialed in, could really give a rip about things. It was more difficult talking to the parents than the kids when things arose. They just wouldn't get on the same page, I think the attention span was short on their end as well!!

The last straw was - one girl got pregnant but was doing very well in school, the powers that be wanted her to bow out and just get her G.E.D. and he said NO WAY!!! She stays!!! She wanted to stay , was doing well but things go so bad that she finally just decided fine, I'll take the test and just get the hell out of here. So they tested her, she passed with flying colors and they turned around and accused her of cheating! My friend, the teacher knew that this was not the case and he demanded a re-test with no one in the room but the teachers and her. She took it and aced it again. At that point, she turned in her paper and he turned in his resignation.

He was a concert painist, is a world traveler and just a fascinating man and they lost an incredible teacher for those kids and many to come.

But I dare say there is something a bit more sinister at work here. I hate to say such things but I've seen it in action and it's just so easy to lead the masses when they are brainwashed and pliable subjects, basically with their brains disengaged and mouthing whatever the T.V. or the news media tells them mouth....critical thinking and questionning is optional and really frowned upon.

I stood in line last night at a store and this guy in front of me was looking at a talking Ozzie Osbourne doll and commenting about how he wants one. (groan) And then he goes, yea, I just can't get enough of Jen and Ben, my whole life revolves around their life and what's going on next! I looked at him and said - you're kidding right? He goes NOOOO, I'm not, I can't get enough of all that stuff, like the Madonna and Britney kiss! I just shook my head and asked.......so.......I guess you buzz right by the news and what's really going on in our country, right? He goes, oh that stuff bores me..... Well, enough said.... And that's the very reason Bush is not being held accountable here in the states for his war crimes and tyranny and Blair is getting reamed a new one in England! But he always was the appointed fall guy so that's no new surprise.... He's such a puppet...

It's no big secret that we do not honor integrity as being something we need to have. The better you can lie and get away with it - the more your praised and looked up to as "having it all goin' on!" The person with the most toys wins....until there is only one person left and the air isn't worth breathing on planet earth and you have no one to worship you. Whoopsie!

We're racing so fast towards the instant gratification that we are leaving so much in the dirt behind us....that I'm not sure we can circle around and go back for it later when we have that clarifying moment of "Oh Shit!"

I look at Lord of the Rings and go - was the man a Prophet or what????

And the funny thing is......people know something is missing....they come apart at the seams all over the place and there's meth and cocaine and sex and money to be had so - off they go, stuffing, stuffing, stuffing ever into the void....

I look at the science of propaganda, psyche ops and just plain old fashion con games and we're such little lambs and mouth the words as we go right down the bunny trail after the pied piper.......NO ONE can fool ME!!!! Yikes, does anyone ever read history or what???

That quick fix has a very high price tag and what is easy - is often deadly. And the warriors in life sit and watch....and wait for the smoke to clear and wonder if there will be enough of them left to help rebuild the world when it implodes?

With us in the states we suffered a large stake through the heart with the establishing of the Federal Reserve. We were bought, lock, stock and barrel. Alot of people don't realize that. They don't know what's really going on behind the scenes and what's been played out in history a thousand times already. We don't know "who" the european banking families are that own us and we don't see our impending doom ahead. We don't realize that we are walking right into a well baited trap and that someone is playing us like a fine violin. But like you said, the leaves on the tree are beginning to bud....

or does that go....the fruit on the tree is beginning to "rot"?

September 18, 2003
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I can only agree with you on everything that you have said.

We have a prime minister, little Johnny Howard, who is Bush's adoring little brother. As far as little Johnny is concerned, anything that big Georgie says, goes.

Little Johnny lies through his teeth. But he has become a past master at fogging, besmudging, evading, the issue of his lack of honesty and integrity. He has been accused so many times of lying to the Australian people with total justification for the accusations. Yet he is still in power and has a 60% popularity rating. Does that imply that 60% of the Australians surveyed have their head up their arses? Can the results of the survey be extrapolated to be taken as representative of the opinion of the rest of the population of Australia? It seems that neither Bush nor Howard can 'lie straight in bed'. Methinketh they both speak with fork tongue.

In Australia, our rainfall has been decreasing at an alarming rate. Now the scientists are point the finger to the fruits of our total disregard for the warnings given twenty years ago about our levels of pollution.

Do I hear any debate in our parliament that is televised daily? NO!! All I hear and see is lots of lies, one-upmanship, deceit, insincerity, and self-centred nest feathering. Our politicians are without one shread of integrity on all sides of the political spectrum and after only one short period of 4 years in office they get a huge lump sum superannuation payout immediately on being sacked by the public in spite of their atrocious performances in running the country. One can now see how Hitler came to power.

We have a few good men and women in our parliament but they are independent members who possess little political clout and who can only react with a small voice rather than proact!!! They are not taken seriously.

It seems to me that as soon as someone joins a political party all integrity is lost and the party line must be toed.

I'd like to see forming political parties made illegal and all political parties disbanded.

I'd like to see all presently sitting members declared independent and collusion and conspiratorial behavior by members of parliament legislated as an indictable offense.

I'd like to see each parliamentary member be made accountable to his/her electorate directly at monthly public meetings held within his/her electorate. I'd like to see direct feedback into a member's pinky about what his/her electorate thinks of his/her performance or lack thereof.

I'd like to see power and control given back to the people in a truly democratic way - not as it exists now in the pseudo-democracies in the world today.

September 18, 2003
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AMEN AND PREACH IT BROTHER!!! HERE, HERE!!!! I'll vote for YOU! What are you running for?? (smile)

I know, I know Tez.....just burns my butt, it really does. I get most of my news, btw from whatreallyhappened.com Pretty good site. At least it's from many different sources.

I often wonder if it is ever possible to ascend to such heights of power and not be totally corrupted?

OR......if you aren't corrupted when you get there, you'll be assassinated shortly, or blackmailed appropriately..

A few good men..........ah yes I think it's always "been that way". The "few".

I got a real kick out of the little deal on the aircraft carrier with Bush and how his flight suit was stuffed in one particular place. I'm like NO FREAKING WAY did he do that!! Oh please!!! But after seeing the picture a few times here and there, yep.......the guy stuffed.

But the whole thing from beginning to end is just vile. I mean if you really read at all and search out things for yourself - what is going down in Iraq is just awful. And so let's see.......this all started because of 9/11......hm,m,m....soooo, do we have any of the people that actually had anything to DO with 9/11 yet? OH......I see, we don't.....and so, okay, um, well, uh........what exactly ARE we doing here then?

But you can find that answer in what happened with Pearl Harbor. Few people know that story or the one about what started the Spanish American war. People don't realize that wars are started on purpose and that people are LED to rally in a certain direction and if it means blowing up a few thousand people in order to do that - well......a little sacrifice for the overall good (of course I mean a select overall good)......a few calculations on the old computer and Yea, okay, yea, that's fine.

But OMG, when I ever say that this Could have happened here, people just go I can't BELIEVE you'd think that way and I go........and I can't believe you don't THINK at all!!

September 19, 2003
7:31 pm
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Ladeska.

Yep! Lemmings ... that's humanity - following the leaders over the cliff into WWIII - hmmmmm!

September 19, 2003
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I don't get it Tez. I guess I'm really trying to just accept this and it's hard. I talk to people about things and it's like there is no one home. I regularly bring stuff up, like what do you think about such and such and they immediately get on the defensive and say well WHY? And I'm like wellllll....um like it threatens our whole existence and just wanted to know what you thought about it, that's all? And I'll get something like - I don't talk about politics or religion, or I just stand by our President, or I'm just leaving it up to God, I'm sure everything will work out, we have to trust in people that know more than we do, OR, my favorite, "HUH?"

I just try and prick people a little bit to think or ask questions and it's like I threw hot soup in their face. It's not about me being right or anything like that, it's about us being responsible here and what I see thus far is - that's why people elect the leaders, or let the mafia do their thing (same thing these days) because they really, really don't want to be responsible. We put them in charge so now we just go live our lives. The trouble with people in our country is - we've never had an emperor or a dictator before but other countries have.......the same ones now that are looking at us cross-eyed and going, um excuse me, but do you people not see what's happening here and hell no we won't support you in this?? Americans don't have the kind of long history that alot of other countries do and we erroneously think that we are quite entitled and such a thing could NEVER happen to US!!! Now that's a real scary position to take and is ripe pickings for those who would grab such an opportunity and run with it, all the while telling the masses whatever words to keep them at bay and apeased for the moment.

Our rights are being stolen right out from under us right, left and sideways and everyone is just la-la-land. I can't tell you how many people don't even know what the Patriot Act is and just look at me blankly and go - the what? If I say a little bit about it - then it's the condescending look of - "oh.....you're one of "those"...you've been reading too many conspiracy theories....

Well..alot of those theories are now turning into fact, hard solid fact and yet - the sheep are still fast asleep, fat, happy and ready to march with the masses when their fearless leaders says - oh, run jump off this cliff. Lemmings.....yes, lemmings..

I'm wondering what our soldiers are going to really say when they come back to the states? In fact, they are already saying quite a bit but it's a crime for them to say too much about the prez, so they had better watch themselves....and I'm quite sure they do. But things are leaking out, you'll just never hear much of it on the news. And family members are getting very jumpy. I would be, too. And the way this administration is cutting their pay and their benefits right and left, I wouldn't call that - supporting the troops. Something kind of smells about that whole scene. Here they are, in the middle depleted uranium dust night and day and you think they aren't going to come home and be messed up for life? Of course they are. But the medical benefits have been curtailed so that when their illness does set in - guess what? You're shit out of luck soldier boy or girl but hey, thanks for the memory and too bad you weren't our pick for starring in the Jessica Lynch saga. She's making quite the little bundle for keeping her mouth shut. What a charade that all was. Her parents even admitted on T.V. that they were told not to talk about what went on there. Um, and why is that? They made a wrong turn, her injuries were not from her having to shoot her way out of anything or from stab wounds, she had no gunshot wounds at all, just broken bones from basically a vehicle accident, they were very nice to her in the hospital, tried to turn her over to our authorities even and no one stood in their way when the big commando team came into rescue her. They just - walked in and got her. But oh no, we had to have it all filmed and made it look like it was this big huge drama, told a dozen lies at least about the whole thing and yet...we just mozy on eating grass and taking a snooze.... I mean this shit is outrageous!!! And WHAT weapons of mass destruction?? Have we found them yet??? I had to laugh at that little tape that Mr. Powell showed everyone regarding the trucks at this compound moving things and it was weapons of mass destruction!!!! Um so........like.........the same satellites that took these pictures couldn't follow those trucks out of there.......to where they were going and find them????? And the quality of those pictures were NOT what those satellites are capable of. They pick up freckles on your nose and these were so blurry you could barely tell it was trucks you were looking at. I mean it's just to the point of being outlandishly comical how bad it all is and yet, we just swallow....

I think the only reason people get to the point of blatantly lying and it being this bad is because - they don't have anything to worry about anymore because - no one cares!! And if they do care, they sure as hell won't get air time. That one was painfully obvious when the biggest war protests in the history of the world all - over the world - got about as much coverage as - a car jacking in L.A. They are basically making a mockery of us and laughing at how weak and gullible we all are. They don't care anymore if it's over the top or if they lie and it's all ridiculous. It's just the pompous arrogant attitude flying now of SO - What are you gonna DO about it, huh? You can't look at Bush and not see that attitude, it's all over the man and his little cronies. But, one thing I'm finding out is - people admire this anymore. They admire bullies, good liars and people who get away with it. We may say one thing in church and in our communities but the bottomline is - if we really really had that kind of fiber - things would not be - the way they are today because people would not have allowed it to go this far.

Btw.......Robert Kennedy came out yesterday and said that the 4 million dollars that are being spent a month in Iraq, half of it is unaccounted for and he wants to know what is going on? And we are having a hard time making ends meet over here and can't keep schools open? Oh, and can't pay our troops decent money either, but hey! Bush is making a profit on the war and so is Cheney. We do treat our Emperors well, don't we?

September 20, 2003
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Duh! Can't believe I said that! It wasn't Robert Kennedy, HELLO, it was Edward Kennedy! I always get their names mixed up for some dumb reason.

September 20, 2003
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All I know is that I wouldn't be alive today if I didn't have video games. If I only had myself to live with for all those years I was alone then I would have successfully killed myself a long time ago.

I don't play so much now as I used to. Of course I feel like an ass saying this since I just spent the last 4 hours playing a computer game. But it's a new game. I usually don't play much anymore.

September 20, 2003
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I understand that, Silence. I do... And that is a very sad commentary that you didn't have real live human beings that cared about you or that you were so far into yourself that you couldn't reach out to anyone. I used to use television for that same reason growing up. I had no one. The only good role models or friends were in the tube. Back then, the influence on T.V. wasn't that bad. We had good role models on there alot. Nowadays, it's a different story.

September 20, 2003
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The Buddha talked about the three poisons of anger, greed and ignorance.

In my view, anger is a conditioned emotional fear response to a perceived threat, 'real' or 'imaginary'.

Greed has at its base the belief and associated fear that we will not 'have enough' or will not be 'alright' or 'good enough' without having or being 'this or that' .

The perceived 'need' for more AV stimulation surely falls into this greed category. Boredom is often symptomatic of this 'need'.

Ignorance is a direct result of all of our past conditioning that fosters the indelible perception in us that we are at different times either a 'subject' or an 'object' independent of all that is 'other' than 'ourselves'!

Our self-seducing egos make it an imperative that we defend this mind constructed 'subject' and/or 'object' self vigorously by all sorts of mind games and our consequent behaviors. Our egos set up out intent!

All of the above three 'poisons' combine in humanity and the consequence is the world as we perceive it today.

Yet all is impermanent, fluxing, waxing and waining - our 'selves' included. But how we fight either against or to manipulate that change process called life on earth. We are like King Canute trying to hold back the tide and then becoming angry at, frustrated by, depressed by, or down right apathetic about being unable to control the magnificence of the ebbing and flowing tide of life to suit our own self-seeking purposes.

At times how we humans suffer as a direct consequence of ourselves - myself most definitely included. 🙂

September 20, 2003
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Well said, Tez!

September 24, 2003
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Just curious...... but does anyone know where this quote comes from?

"Having established approximately the Modus Agendi we will occupy ourselves with details of those combinations by which we have still to complete the revolution in the course of the machinery of State in the direction already indicated.

By these combinations I mean the freedom of the Press, the right of association, freedom of conscience, the voting principle, and many another that must disappear for ever from the memory of man, or undergo a radical alteration the day after the promulgation of the new constitution.

It is only at the moment that we shall be able at once to announce all our orders, for, afterwards, every noticeable alteration will be dangerous, for the following reasons: if this alteration be brought in with harsh severity and in a sense of severity and limitations, it may lead to a feeling of despair caused by fear of new alterations in the same direction; if, on the other hand, it be brought in a sense of further indulgences it will be said that we have recognized our own wrong-doing and this will destroy the prestige of the infallibility of our authority, or else it will be said that we have become alarmed and are compelled to show a yielding disposition, for which we shall get no thanks because it will be supposed to be compulsory ...

Both the one and the other are injurious to the prestige of the new constitution. What we want is that from the first moment of its promulgation, while the peoples of the world are still stunned by the accomplished fact of the revolution, still in a condition of terror and uncertainty, they should recognize once for all that we are so strong, so inexpugnable, so super-abundantly filled with power, that in no case shall we take any account of them, and so far from paying any attention to their opinions or wishes, we are ready and able to crush with irresistible power all expression or manifestation thereof at every moment and in every place, that we have seized at once everything we wanted and shall in no case divide our power with them ... Then in fear and trembling they will close their eyes to everything, and be content to await what will be the end of it all."

September 24, 2003
5:29 pm
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Not I.

September 24, 2003
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What do you think of this writing, Tez?

September 26, 2003
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Ladeska,

Knew I'd read that somewhere ... had to go hunting but....it is Protocol #11 of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Here's some commentary I found on them.... "Ever since their publication "The Protocols" have been the most controversial writings in the world. Powerful elements in society have made them controversial so that few would be courageous enough to use them. We are well aware that whoever uses the "Protocols" as a legitimate reference is automatically labeled as a fool and an "anti-Semite", for they are vehemently condemned by Jews as the product of either Russian Czar Nicholas II and his gov't, or as plagiarized material from other sources such as the "Geneva Dialogues" written by one Maurice Joly."

What's the scoop? I know basically nothing about the history/background whatever. Gut reaction -- pretty inflammatory stuff. Arrogance and an inflated sense of self-importance seem to echo thruout. At first, my guess was going to be Hitler...with his plan of a new world order or race. Seems to follow the same ruthlessness in the carrying out of whatever these perceived protocols call for.

What do YOU think of this writing Ladeska?

September 26, 2003
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Yep, tis a quandry, who shot John, who wrote what when and the debate rages on.

I wish we could just look at things sometimes without going - OMG, you're an anti-this or that and that means this and the other thing, so OFF with your heads!!! Looking at something like this, that if it was written by the Zionist faction of the jews, does not in any way mean that - it came from the jews as a whole. That would be like taking the white supremist stuff and saying if you rail against this you are "anti-white". Um noooo.......

Every race, color and creed has sects with the group that do their own thing and does not represent the whole. I'm sure the debate will rage on about this particular thing until we're just a puff a smoke in the atmosphere.

But no one is beyond reproach here, not us, not the jews, not the zionists, no one. We have to look at all things objectively and equally. I just scratch my head sometimes when things do come up like this or other things and people go YOU can't talk about that because if you do you're a jew hater!!! C'mon guys, for crying outloud, that's not how you examine things, it's not how you reason, it's not how you find out the truth with anything. We can look at a myriad of things down through history where real scientific advancement was halted because of thinking like this.

We look in our own government and see corruption abounding but if we say......We're not patriotic Americans if we question......then where does that leave us?

I, personally, don't see the jews as any different than the rest of us, not worse and not better. They are just people trying to get along in this world. They may have factions like the Zionists that need some closer inspection, just like we have our Skull and Bones people that Bush is a part of.

I'm not into the whole thing of one people on this planet being more chosen by God than anyone else. I'm sorry, but I have a big problem with that one. Sorry if it doesn't suit anyone but that's the way I feel about it.

They can show me the bible and all the history they want to but I, for one know, that if it's written by man, it can be and will be tampered with. I trust what I understand from my own personal experience with God and nothing more. He loves me and the jews and the catholics and the hindus and the buddhists and the whatever else - the same in my book.

Man is partial and biased. What made this universe is not "that petty".

You put us all on a scale and we've got the same faults, talents, weaknesses, strengths, characteristics. We're all human, not some are better or less than others.

That is man's thinking, always was and always will be.

So whatever spouts anything that splits us all up and puts us in a tier kind of existence, is mankind basically working against mankind and it's survival. That thinking supports implosion.

September 26, 2003
5:25 pm
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Ladeska.

On the 24-Sep-03, regarding your earlier posting of the same day, you asked:

"What do you think of this writing, Tez?"

I presume that your question refers to the validity of the meaning of the content rather than regarding its literary style.

Well I think the writer is making valid observations regarding some of the pitfalls inherent in adopting 'authoritive'leadership styles in weilding the reigns of power; that is, your dammed if you do and dammed if you don't.

For some time now I have realised that few leaders can grasp the ineffectuality of authoritive leadership. Such leadership styles may work within the do or die regimen of the military on the battle field wherein quick unquestioning responses often make the difference between victory and defeat. However, even in the military, today these pitfalls are being recognized more and more. 'Blue on Blues' are the result of the old ways. I am personally amazed at the relaxation in the styles of discipline in today's military as opposed to that when I did my stint of military service in both the army and the air force throughout the 1960's and through to the mid 1970's.

If power is to be weilded at any level, to be effective, it has to be power based upon the ongoing and freely given consent of the people over which the power is being weilded. The masses have to participate in the decision making processes. Otherwise, sooner or later, just as in "Animal Farm" the oppressed become the oppressors. The British ruled by authoritive power their American Colonies. What happened? The American War of Independence was the outcome. Then the civil war ensued. This time the status quo predominated. Now we have American Imperialism as never before seen on this planet. Britian having been Imperialists of old are indulging in a little decadent deja vu under the umbrella of its much more powerful 'offspring'. However, without the once contrachecking USSR to maintain the balance of authoritative power now we have only the terrorism of the less powerful and exploited to maintain any balance. However such methods of weilding power on both sides won't prevail for long.

Now we are seeing that the lessons of history have not been yet learnt. 'Might' never makes 'right' and the 'end' never justifies the 'means'. We have a lot to learn from Mahatma Gandi about leadership and governing nations.

In 1993, Ricardo Semler published his astounding little book called "Maverick". Without any prior experience in management, he turned his father's failing mega business enterprise around into a staggering success because he understood the flaws in authoritive leadership. He implemented a style of leadership based upon consensus, cooperation and integration rather than dictates, confrontation and division. Our leaders in this so called democracy, are still trying to wield authoritive power pretending that it is based upon the wishes of the people. Well... to achieve the limited success that they seem to do, they have to propagandize, lie, cheat, manipulate, cooerce, and bring all kinds of social pressure to bear to keep the masses 'in line'. What are the results? Massive pollution, unemployment, wars, terrorism etc.

With today's technologies at no other time in history are the democratic processes made more viable. Referendums on key issues could be carried out by mass robotic emailing processes that require minimal labour involved. However integrity comes from within. Trying to legislate for integrity is futile. Yet our governments are still trying to enforce socially desirable behavior by punitive means - our jails are overflowing and crime rates rising at an alarming rate.

What do I think? All problems stem from the deluded mind. The Buddha so eloquently defined both the problem and the solution so well two and a half thousand years ago. His ellucidations are more relevant today than they ever where. Time is running out for humanity on this planet. At a species level, for us it's a case of 'shape up or ship out' I'm afraid. I suspect that the latter will become the imperative and our extinction on this planet may be inevitable. So what! Such is the way of it since time immemorial. We are not the first species nor the last by a long shot to destroy our habitat.

I bet you're sorry you asked what I think about that acticle now!

September 26, 2003
5:39 pm
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No, not sorry one bit, Tez. (smile) Not one bit. I agree with you wholeheartedly. I wouldn't add or detract one thing.

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