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Codi's Corner
February 17, 2008
9:05 am
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Codi202
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February 23, 2008
6:25 pm
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Codi202
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"It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
No nightingale: look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east:
Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops.
I must be gone and live, or stay and die."

(I should post the above at work.)

Exerpt from Suzi Orman's book:
http://www.oprah.com/tows/past.....071018book

"Whether we like to admit it, we've all probably spent money we don't have to impress people we don't even know or like. Before you spend another dollar, Suze Orman wants you to ask yourself these three questions:

Is it kind?
Is it necessary?
Is it true?
If you answer no to any one of those questions, please stop and don't buy what you're thinking about.

For example, take credit card debt. "It's not kind. Is it necessary? You know that it isn't. And if you don't have the money to pay for it outright, it is not true. If you have to put it on a credit card, it's not true."
http://www.oprah.com/money/cre.....018checkup

February 23, 2008
7:18 pm
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Codi202
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"You have been blessed with health and longevity to have lived this long. Do not waste the precious gift of life. There is a reason why you are still alive and healthy today. Do something. Do something good. Take care of yourself.

Start now. Life is short.

Take care of yourself. You still have work to do.

Please... take care of yourself."

Message from: http://www.bbhq.com/takecare.htm

February 24, 2008
6:59 am
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bevdee
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Codi

I liked your quotes and sites on money. I was in some huge credit card debt 3 years ago. Through hard work, and help from a very good friend, offering me a place with low rent, I have been able to dig out from under the debt and finally get it paid off .

I make good money, but I refuse to go back to that hole of debt. Yesterday, even before you posted this, I was thinking about spending. I could buy a new car. I have the money and my credit is repaired, but I don't need a new one.

I was thinking about how we (I) look at someone with a nice car with admiration. Assume they have money, that they are rich. Instead of wondering what kind of debt they have gotten themselves into just to drive that car. Or live in that house. Or wear those clothes.

So many people live beyond their means for "status". To make themselves feel better, but the feeling is short-lived when the reality of the debt sinks in.

Have you heard that saying? "No matter where you go, there you are."? Well.... No matter what you buy, there you are.

Thanks for the links, Miss Codi.

February 24, 2008
8:25 am
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Codi202
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Hi Bevdee,
See, it was fate. ๐Ÿ™‚
I was looking for the thread that was posted on the support side that listed the pdf link for the book "Women and Money". It was up just until 5 pm that day and now you can't download it (so I hope you got your copy, bevdee). Since this included a link to an exerpt from the book, I thought I would put it there. Since I couldn't find the link, I put it here.

I am glad you like them and that you find them useful.

Thanks for the quote.
Its so true.

hugs

February 25, 2008
7:22 pm
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Codi202
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Subject: mental disorders
From: [email protected]
Date: Mon, 25 Sep 2006 14:22:47 EDT
To: [email protected]

Chronic fatigue,depression,schizophrenia and bipolar,etc. these mental disorders are now known as "disperceptions". they, too, are metabolic disorders and will respond to correction of the imbalance caused by prolonged dehydration. The use of stigmatized names for irregular brain functions, produced by chemical imbalance, will eventually be discontinued. for more explanation, listen to tape # 5. Doctor Batmanghelidj talks about the brain and what causes mental disorders and he also talks about the research of a medical doctor and ph.D. His name is Carl C. Pfeiffer. His book is Nutrition and Mental Illness ISBN 0-89281-226-5. This tape or CD #5 is something that everyone should listen to as well as Dr B's tape/CD # 3. Anyhow # 5 explains what causes mental disorders and how one can correct them. Dr C Pfeiffer went thru 23,000 mental patients and discovered that it was caused from a lack of brain chemicals. This brain chemicals are amino acids and minerals, plus water and salt balance. I strongly suggest that a person get Dr B's book on Obesity,Cancer, Depression. Another very good book is ABC of Asthma,Allergies, and Lupus. When the body is dehydrated (low on water and salt) it has to use up amino acids to keep the body running. This also throws the body out of balance in the brain and in many important organs
http://www.watercure2.org/

March 7, 2008
5:29 am
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Codi202
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RIGHT NOW
Somebody is very proud of you.
Somebody is thinking of you.
Somebody is caring about you.
Somebody misses you.
Somebody wants to talk to you.
Somebody wants to be with you.
Somebody hopes you aren't in trouble.
Somebody is thankful for the support you have provided.
Somebody wants to hold you hand.
Somebody hopes everything turns out alright.
Somebdoy wants you to be happy.
Somebody wants you to find him/her.
Somebody is celebrating your successes.
Somebody wants to give you a gift.
Somebody thinks that you ARE a gift.
Somebody hopes you're not too cold, or too hot.
Somebody wants to hug you.
Somebody loves you.
Somebody admires your strength.
Somebody is thinking of you and smiling.
Somebody wants to be your shoulder to cry on.
Somebody wants to go out with you and have a lot of fun.
Somebody thinks the world of you.
Somebody wants to protect you.
Somebody would do anything for you.
Somebody wants to be forgiven.
Somebody is grateful for your forgivness.
Somebody wants to laugh with you.
Somebody remembers you and wishes you were there.
Somebody is praising God for you.
Somebody needs to know your love is unconditional.
Somebody values your advice.
Somebody wants to tell you how much they care.
Somebody wants to share their dreams with you.
Somebody wants to hold you in their arms.
Somebody wants you to hold them in your arms.
Somebody treasures your spirit.
Somebody wishes they could stop time because of you.
Somebody praises God for your friendship and love.
Somebody can't wait to see you.
Somebody loves you for who you are.
Somebody loves the way you make them feel.
Somebody wants to be with you.
Somebody wants you to know they are there for you.
Somebody's glad you're his/her friend.
Somebody wants to be your friend.
Somebody stayed up all night thinking about you.
Somebody is alive because of you.
Somebody is wishing you noticed him/her.
Somebody wants to get to know you better.
Somebody wants to be near you.
Somebody misses your advice/guidance.
Somebody has faith in you.
Somebody trusts you.
Somebody hears a song that reminds them of you.
Somebody needs your support.
Somebody needs you to have faith in them.
Somebody needs you to send them this post or print off and send to them.
Somebody needs you to let them be your friend

(Clipping from a News paper)

March 9, 2008
4:47 pm
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March 15, 2008
9:03 am
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March 19, 2008
6:03 am
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March 19, 2008
6:07 am
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the article:
Coping with losing a loved one is one of life's more difficult, yet inevitable, tasks. Bereavement experts continually gather data to help us better understand the particulars of grief. And if you have lived through the pain of mourning, you know that any way to ease that pain is a welcome thing. While many areas of the topic have been studied, it's important to note that there are individual patterns of grieving.

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Grief has long been broken down into stages. One cycle made famous by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D., uses the stages of denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. But researchers have shown that stages don't always apply. Camille Wortman, Ph.D., and Roxane Cohen Silver, Ph.D., found several individual patterns. For example, some people suffer interminable grief, and others show no distress at all.

In fact, avoiding grief sometimes helps recovery. George Bonanno, Ph.D., of Columbia University, found that those who repressed grief were psychologically and physically healthier six and 14 months after their losses than others who grieved more. Although that's a surprising discovery, it's not to be confused with denial.

The recovery period can also vary widely. While some people recover in a year, there are those who find the second year to be much worse. According to Theresa Rando, Ph.D., of the Institute for the Study and Treatment of Loss, people who suffer abrupt loss can find the second year of bereavement harder than the first. When a person dies suddenly, the mourner learns the reality of their loss by having the need for the loved one repeatedly frustrated. These people may enter a state of shock that delays recovery, often for extended lengths of time.

Even when male and female grievers are compared, there are patterns and differences. A recent University of Kentucky survey found that men grieve in a way that does not seem like grieving. While women talk and cry, men think and act. Men, for example, often mourn the death of their fathers by taking action. When 46-year-old Neil Mose's father died, Mose took up the martial art wing chun. His father practiced the art every morning at dawn, and Mose learned to do the same.

Regardless of method, any means of easing the pain is appreciated, seeing as one-third of grieving individuals suffer detrimental physical or mental effects, according to the British Medical Journal (BMJ). From depression to anxiety and impaired immune response to heart disease, the potential effects are many and varied. Even something as simple as disrupted sleep can weaken the system. University of Pittsburgh researchers, for example, revealed that disrupted sleep in elderly mourners decreases levels of natural killer cells, which help destroy illness-causing agents.

Indeed, it's vital to take note of the many findings that help quell grieving. There is research, for example, focusing on loss and spirituality. Quite plainly, when and if people do find meaning in the loss, they are better able to cope than those who do not. According to Holly Prigerson, Ph.D., of Yale University, "Bereaved individuals who relied on religion to cope generally used outpatient services less frequently."

Her study, which appeared recently in the International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, is one of many in this area. In a similar BMJ study, researchers found that people who have strong spiritual beliefs seem to resolve grief more rapidly and completely than those with no beliefs.

Here are helpful tips if you are assisting a grieving friend:

• Don't force your method of grieving: Respect what the person wants.

• Avoid minimizing the loss: Never tell the person to "get over it."

• Be a better listener: Be aware of your feelings; and know you can't solve the problem.

• Be with the mourner: You just have to be there with the person.

Melanie Greenberg, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at Alliant International University.

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