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Psychologist's Notes on Me
September 5, 2001
7:02 am
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chickadee
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My husband & I attended marriage counseling a couple years back. I ended up going back to see the counselor (who was a Ph.D) for some issues on my own later on -- such a clinical depression and the suicide death of a friend. Now I am getting a new job, and the company made me sign a medical release form so they can go look at my medical records. They asked if I had ever gone to see a mental health counselor, including marriage counseling, so I said, yes, marriage counseling. I did not tell them about my counseling after the marriage counseling, since it was the same counselor and we did discuss (briefly) my marriage at each visit. My question is, did my counselor notify my primary care doctor that I was seeing him, and when this company goes to my primary dr. to look at my records, will they see that I attended for more than just marriage counseling? I'm very worried about this and if anybody can tell me, I would be grateful.

September 5, 2001
12:12 pm
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Cici
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The psychologist is bound by ethics not to reveal the reason for your visits. It's called patient-client privilege, and it means that anyone with access to public records from insurance will be able to see that you did go to the psych, and what dates you went, but they can't ask your psych why you went.

September 5, 2001
1:18 pm
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pill
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The insurance company is not supposed to devulge anything at all about your medical records to your employer. If they do, I might look in to suing them. Even then, there's no guarantee the agent won't discuss your records.

Why don't you ask them what their policy is?

September 5, 2001
1:21 pm
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Windslasher
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I do agree with Cici here. Everyone has their own privacy in somehow. I think ur psychologist will be have ethics to know what they can reveal and what they can't. Be strong and face the new life in the future.

Even if they will to find out about it, just tell them that it all over and it a new u, yourself now. Don't let this stop u. We, as a human, have to move on in life, right? What is past is past already, let be strong and look forward for a better tomorrow.

All the best to u and ur future.

Regards -Windslasher

September 5, 2001
2:04 pm
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Molly
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You know all of this is extreamly signifigant. There are new laws being processed and written regarding just this issue. If we don't pay more attention, we are totally giving up our rights. If we don't give permission, they want to know what we are hiding, if we do give our permission, its all out there for their intrepretation. We are screwed either way. The employers have been monitoring credit reports, dmv reports, which do tell alot about a person, now medical which will include psychological treatment. its another way of screening for workmans comp, disability, drug and alcohol problems, histories of abscentee reports, which all effect employment stability. It goes hand in hand with the total background checks, big brother is forever continuing the intrusion into our lives.
I would double check what you signed, you may have given permission, regardless of what ethics are in place, some of the new documents, are written so well, you would have to go to court to get a ruling after the damage is done, we all need to be on our toes even if we don't have anything to hide, the intrepretation of the data will be up to the clerk of the day.

September 5, 2001
2:33 pm
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Cici
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Just call your psych and ask what their office policy is on patient-client privilege, and then call your insurance company. I'm not sure that psychs have to refer to primary care doctors.

Upone further reflection I think it's only psychiatrists who prescribe medication who are obligated to inform the patient's primary care physiciam about what medications they are currently on. Since psychologists can't prescribe meds, it shouldn't have been an issue.

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