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memory and stress
August 20, 2006
2:10 am
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Anonymous
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Does anyone know if memory problems are associated with stress?

August 20, 2006
2:20 am
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Anonymous
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yes they are. it is a sign of chronic stress. i think of it as stress overload.

August 20, 2006
2:24 am
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ggfred4
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I am not a doctor but feel that stress can cause just about everything. It alters body functions.
How are you doing P&L? Thinking about you and your situation, okay, I am worried about you,

My codependent caring self, gg

August 20, 2006
2:31 am
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southgoingzax
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P&L,

stress can cause vitamin and mineral depletion and hormonal imbalances which can cause brain fog and memory issues...your body isn't supposed to be in "fight or flight" all the time. You might try taking a stress complex B and C with Iron, or at the very least a multi-vitamin. I'd also suggest testing for anemia.

zax
(I'm not a doctor, but have had a LOT of malnutrition/stress/depression related issues)

August 20, 2006
2:54 am
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Anonymous
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i take mega b vitamins, get tested for anemia and other nutritional stuff a lot...I am underweight due to a health thing...just wondering about the memory thing. I am in need of post-its, and other reminders since I have been under all this stress, but wondering if that is all it is...

August 20, 2006
2:55 am
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Anonymous
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in fact, I thought I posted on another thread about this, but can't remember which.

August 21, 2006
9:33 am
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Anonymous
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I understand complex B vitamins arent assimilated if one doesnt take zinc. So much for my vitamin database... But Ive had short term memory loss due to rivotril, Im guessing. I think the sleeping pills are a trigger factor. Not sure.

August 21, 2006
10:23 am
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StronginHim77
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I know that shock or trauma can give us memory lapses. There are entire chunks of events which I simply CANNOT remember, following my late husband's sudden death three years ago. My sons (18 & 14 at the time) suffered similar memory gaps.

When I am trying to carry too much, I will find myself becoming very forgetful about really stupid, day-to-day things, even when I write stuff down. So, I think elevated stress levels can cause us to have memory difficulties. Our minds and nervous systems can't be stretched too far without some sort of "fallout."

August 21, 2006
10:32 am
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I found this info on-line. It is an article written by Dr. Barry Bittman from a website called Mind-Body.org. I hope it helps...

** It is important to consider that stress coupled with anxiety and loss of control produces temporary memory problems for most of us. Under a great deal of pressure, it’s not uncommon to forget even the simplest routines. Fortunately, when the situation improves, our memory follows suit. Yet when the stressor persists, or worsens, such as in the case of caring for a loved-one with an ongoing debilitating illness, or facing extraordinary cutbacks and pressure at work, the central nervous system begins to show progressive signs of wear and tear¾ damage that is sometimes irreversible.

The concept that one important factor in the development of progressive memory loss is ongoing stress has recently been supported by the pioneering research of Bruce McEwen, PhD, head of the Neuroendocrinology laboratory at the world-renowned Rockefeller University in New York. His breakthrough findings were recently reported in a review article published in the New England Journal of Medicine on January 15th, 1998. Dr. McEwen proposes that repeated stress can lead to the body’s inability to turn off its major biological stress pathway; a factor that can directly lead to significant memory loss.

For simplification, two basic mechanisms are suggested. First, stress increases cortisol secretion by the adrenal glands that directly inhibits short-term memory function in an area of the brain referred to as the hippocampus. If the perception of stress ensues, the production of two substances directly results in atrophy or wasting away of nerve fibers termed dendrites in the hippocampus. Two notable culprits are glucocorticoids (the body’s natural steroids), and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters (chemical substances that enable nerve transmission in key areas).

If stress is short-lived, memory loss is reversible. However, if it persists for long periods of time (typically months to years), the affected neurons in the brain die and unfortunately do not grow back!

Frankly, these findings are both frightening and promising.

The ongoing cerebral wear and tear we suffer due to chronic stress is certainly alarming. However, on the flip side, the prospect of actively preventing nerve cell loss in our brains places the concept of “wellness” in a rather extraordinary light.

So, with this in mind, why not take a moment to ask yourself just a few simple questions. Have you been forgetful lately, and are you under a great deal of stress? If the answers are yes, here’s a prescription you can live with.

Consider taking time to resolve or distance yourself, (even if it’s only mentally) from the stressful situation you are facing. Learn to de-stress yourself by discovering what you enjoy the most, and make time to do it regularly. And if you’re one of those individuals who needs justification to have fun, consider such diversion a wonderful investment in safeguarding your memory and well being. I’ll be delighted to write the prescription¾ Mind over Matter! **

August 21, 2006
7:04 pm
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Anonymous
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WOW, thanks tc! Much appreciated, yet scary.

August 25, 2006
2:43 am
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doubleloss
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great posting! I was wondering about that not long ago. Not only memory loss but lack of concentration. Stress is so dangerous, I need to learn how to keep it under control, or how to manage my feelings better?

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