Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_TopicIcon
Meditation / Relaxation Techniques
January 3, 2000
11:29 am
Avatar
site coordinator
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hello all...and Tez may I have your attention 🙂

I am on a thought train that sooo much of our pain, anxiety/worry, low self feelings can be lightened w/ more tuning in-to the self?

Tez has made reference to meditation in his own life on many threads here. He has spent (and still spends?) a good deal of time getting in touch w/ self through meditation.

We can safely say that all of us are suffering and enduring varying amounts of trauma and pain in our lives...but how much of our current suffering is due to current events...versus how much is due to thinking about the past? Can meditation help? How does it relate?

Tez, can you give us your feedback on the subject, and how you think it fits into recovery (past and present).

- SC

January 3, 2000
11:51 am
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

is meditation / relaxation always something that has to do with sitting still and calming down? I don't think so. I think dancing can be a good method to relax and to meditate. Although my father propably would call my dancing "jumping around madly" and the music that goes with it "noise" or worse. It feels good, and I certainly get rid of the knots in my neck and backside, so it's surely relaxing. And sometimes it feels like being elsewhere - is that meditation?

January 4, 2000
5:47 pm
Avatar
Guest
Guests

Site Coord.

Phew!

You posed the question , "… how much of our current suffering is due to current events...versus how much is due to thinking about the past?"

Most of my suffering has been caused by my attitude to current events that ‘trigger’ the recall of painful, past emotional memories into my conscious awareness. My negative feelings are my awareness of these emotional arousal states. Very seldom is my life and well being actually threatened by present events; it only seems that way. Current events are mostly emotional memory recall triggers. Sometimes I have contextual memory recall associated with the emotional recall that allowed me to remember the past events that caused the original emotional responses. Other times I am only aware of a feeling coming out of ‘left field’. I then start thinking about what caused the feeling. I very often incorrectly attribute ‘blame’ for the cause of the feeling to others in the present.

Thinking about the painful past events can often result in re-experiencing those past emotional responses by invoking emotional arousal in the present. In my attempts to relieve my emotional pain, I tend to try to justify my past behaviour to myself and to attribute blame to others. The mental gyrations that result usually lead to much more suffering. It is a vicious trap. I tend to either wallow in guilt , or see myself as a helpless victim. I am trying to change that which cannot be changed; namely, the past. Fear build up in the form of anxiety and worry is inevitable. Often my anxieties are based on ungrounded and unfocussed past fears manifesting in the present. The inappropriate behaviour and alienation that follows generally results in mental illness of one form or another.

You posed the question , "… "Can meditation help? How does it relate?" and how does it "fits into recovery (past and present)."

Most of my emotional problems emanate from the deep emotional belief that I am a worthless entity; of no account; divorced from the cosmos; existing outside of my environment and extremely vulnerable.

In meditation, my awareness soars into the darkness beyond the outermost galaxies of space, beyond even time itself. My awareness is focussed on a pinpoint of self-illuminated bright golden ‘light’. I merge into the point of light, a singularity. The further I move into the light the more I am encompassed with a beautiful feeling of completeness, at-one-ness, togetherness. Thoughts evaporate and ‘I’ just ‘am’. I feel completely beyond needs; beyond cares. I want to stay there forever.

But eventually, my body hurts from the muscles cramping. I am back in my body. Yet I feel a sense, a trace of my infinite value still remaining. I feel like I have been on vacation after winning a million dollars. My anxieties and fears have taken on a weighting of insignificance. I have ‘seen’ my eternal self. Once again I sense that I cannot really be harmed no matter what happens. Freed from the confusion of a myriad of emotion provoked and provoking thoughts, I am able to evaluate an appropriate course of action and carry it through to completion. My self-esteem builds as a result of each success.

If meditation is practiced on a daily basis, preferably upon rising, I spiral upwards in a spiritual-practical interaction with each supporting the other. For me, the converse is also true. If I do not practice my meditation daily, I tend to spiral downwards to an emotional outburst that ‘forces’ me back to meditation. ‘The extent of my anxiety is a measure of my distance from my God’. (I wish I was the one who coined that phrase) My meditation is my conscious contact with my God. I stress here that I belong to no religion whatever. I have no religious barrow to push. Yet, I also make no apologies for my reliance on the Supreme Essence.

If meditation is so effective, why do I slip back and miss my meditation sessions? Because I get caught up in the drama and my own ego driven desires. I get caught up by the illusions of this world. So, I live my life alternating between self rule and Self rule. Thus is my drama written and enacted.

I know that acceptance of life - including my ‘self’ - on life’s terms is the ultimate panacea for my pain and suffering. Meditation provides a way of knowing from within the Self, the perfection of both my imperfect self and my drama. In it I experience the nature of my eternal existence. After a meditation session, who cares about emotions! They melt away into a general feeling of well being. Therein, for a short time, I am able to love both self and other as One; to live in the ‘now’. But all is contingent on my performing my daily meditation practices. I have not ‘arrived’, I can assure you.

My mind is its own place; in it I can make a ‘heaven’ out of ‘hell’ or a ‘hell’ out of ‘heaven’. The choice is mine.

January 4, 2000
6:00 pm
Avatar
Guest
Guests

Eve.

You asked if dancing can be a form of meditation. I have experienced feelings of well being when ballroom dancing. I guess it depends on your state of consciousness while dancing.

If you consciousness transcends the 'self' while dancing then I guess it is a form of meditation. Meditation techniques and experiences are many and varied.

But then I am certainly no expert on the different meditation techniques. I only know a little about what I do. Maybe others can help?

January 4, 2000
11:59 pm
Avatar
site coordinator
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Tez,

phew is right! thanks for that! 😉

I do think part of the 'definition' of meditation (dictionary may be helpful here, but i like what you said) is "transcending the self".

Feeling free from our worldly and bodily boundaries which tie us to painful memories and feelings of fear and insecurity.

We are our best and our worst enemy.

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

Two cliches which seem to have meaning.

For meditation, I have 'meditated' in the calm sitting down sense as eve elluded to, only a few times. But I do find that breathing, exercise, and reading are stress relieving and/or endorphin releasing (which can make a big difference in mental, emotional, and physical state).

As you mentioned, 'skipping' the necessaries like meditation/relaxation, has much to do w/ our urges to do other things, and our perceived time constraints.

Do others have thoughts about how meditation, relaxation, or other activities may be helpful for them, and how it relates to your current situations?

- SC

January 5, 2000
5:24 am
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Tez, ballroom dancing? Is that what you do as a pair with a formal set of "allowed moves" left, right, left, tap (walzing and suchlike)? Then this isn't exactly what I meant. This kind of dances almost alway leaves me feeling like a big clumsy oaf, because I tend to step on my partners feet a lot :-). I never mastered that art to the extent to trancede the formal rules and get to the fun behind it.

No, what I meant is more like the "tribal" dancing that happens at open air concerts that are rocky and loud or at parties. I don't like discos too much (feel too old there). And sometimes in summer I go outside somewhere, find a meadow and bring my casette-player. I turn on Mozart, Bethoven, Led Zeppelin or Queen and spin round and jump about in the sunshine, sometimes with friends, sometimes alone. And I can really loose myself in outer space whíle I do that. And very very rarely, somebody else can connect and I can take him / her with me. It's wonderful when it happens.

January 5, 2000
7:22 am
Avatar
lost soul
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Interesting topics! I was trying to post some notes last night but was unable to do so.Anyway, I have tried some relaxation stuffs like Aromathrapy, full body massage.Doing arobic can be relaxing too especially the "cool off" stretching.
I have never try Meditation, but have the interest long times ago.( Do not know where to get started )

January 5, 2000
4:24 pm
Avatar
Guest
Guests

Eve.

There is something 'magical' about undulating, whirling and spinning around a dance floor in almost perfect synchronisation with many other dancers. I am unconscious of 'remembering' the 'rules' ; this is done by procedural memory automatically. I understand that the 'whirling dervishes' of one of the sufi sects use dancing as a means of attaining meditation states of altered consciousness. You said, "I can really loose myself in outer space whíle I do that" Perhaps you are doing the same; trancending the self.

The question that often arises about self-transcendence is: 'Who' is it that transcends 'what' to become 'who'?

January 5, 2000
4:50 pm
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Tez, who is "self" anyway? I very much liked Cici's explanation that her "self" fell not into place, but comfortably out of place, like pearls off a string. (Where was that?)
So who is "self" and why would that question be important?
Do we "have to" be a closed system, with logical rules? Hope not;-) Eve

January 6, 2000
3:52 pm
Avatar
site coordinator
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

all,

dictionary...

Meditate:

· to reflect upon; ponder.

· to plan or intend in the mind.

· Meditation:

· a devotional exercise of contemplation

· A contemplative discourse, usually on a religious or philosophical subject

Relaxation:

· refreshment of body or mind; recreation.

· a loosening or slackening

· a reduction in strictness or severity

more thoughts?

January 6, 2000
10:56 pm
Avatar
site coordinator
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Question to all,

How many of you find yourself taking 'stock' of your feelings during the day? If so, how often? What time(s) of the day?

i.e., do you 'check-in' w/ yourself?

When you do check in w/ yourself, and you find a problem (worry, anxiety, tension, anger, depression), do you tend to it? Do you breathe? Do you stop the non-helpful thoughts and behaviors?

- SC

January 10, 2000
6:24 am
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

sc,
I don't consciously "log in" to myself and take stock of my feelings daily. I usually do a quick check "how was this week" on friday afternoon, after I finish work.

I did a course in Feldenkrais-training two years ago and after that I used to "take stock" of my body every morning and evening when laying in bed. For me this was a good early warning method for any tensions building up inside. But I didn't continue. 🙁

How about the others? Why am I the first one to answer this question? Eve

January 10, 2000
3:02 pm
Avatar
site coordinator
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

eve,

thanks for your response.

would like to hear from others if they're reading?

- SC

January 10, 2000
3:13 pm
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

yes, it is interesting to hear what others do or think about that.
I've learned that quite often when I listen to others and how they do things I'll find out that there are other ways of doing it (other ways than my "normal" way of doing things). Sometimes that is the biggest step in finding a solution or a new question :-).

January 12, 2000
12:57 pm
Avatar
Les
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi All!

I'm new to this discussion, but have read the last 2 weeks worth, and thought I would join in.

Re. meditation helping make one's life better, I've found that it helps me a lot to focus my mind, relax, and stay centered. It seems to clear out a lot of anxiety-related garbage. This last year I've been doing more of it than ever before, but that is still not a lot. Before, I did it about 3 times a year, on an emergency basis (e.g., to battle extreme levels of stress or anger). Now, I'm doing it about 1-3 times a week, though my goal is to do it daily. Somehow, I find it difficult to be disciplined enough to do it that frequently. Luckily, it feels so good, that I'm drawn to gradually doing it more often.

Re. dancing, I can relate to both types of dancing described. The free style is the kind I first found I could do, and found that I love. For me, going to Reggae, Blues, and Grateful Dead concerts taught me how to move my body in ways that feel good. I find it extremely liberating.

As far as formal dancing, with steps, and set movements is concerned, for most of my life, I've never liked it for the reason that I've always felt constricted by the rules. But I found that I actually practice something very similar. When I watched the movie "Shall We Dance?" I found that I could very much relate to the characters who love ballroom dancing because I practice the martial Art Aikido. In Aikido, we practice moving with a partner. The movements are flowing, and there is an emphasis on moving from the center of gravity (which should be low), not clashing with the partner, moving with economy, and having good timing. Also, all the movements are set, and we practice them again and again until we can do them without thinking about them. Practicing Aikido becomes very much like meditation, because if you think about anything other concentrating on the moment, you can get hurt, or hurt your partner. So you have to focus your attention on the here and now, which I think is the essence of meditation. Aikido is also an art, and to do it properly, one must pay attention to the aesthetics of it. When I'm practicing Aikido, and flowing with it, it is a wonderful feeling. Interestingly, I've heard that some professional dancers practice Aikido, as a way of improving their other forms of dancing.

Best regards,

Les

January 14, 2000
8:36 am
Avatar
hazza
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi all,
Relaxation,
Well, because i suffer greatly from anxiety and agoraphonia, i am advised by the charity i belong to that help me that i need to practice relaxation daily.
But i cant, i feel that if i relax something bad will happen! I am trying to relax as much as possible in my own way, but i need to find the confidence to allow myself to relax completely.

At my worst even my sleep is unrelaxed with me having panic attacks whilst sleeping as also always being aware of everything around me.

When i have relaxed in the past i have found myself feeling vulnerable that i will somehow fall victim to a panic attack because i am not guarding myself ready for it!

So, tez and others, how do you feel when you relax? can you relate to this at all or am i just bonkers?

I have bought relation tapes but never use them because i cannot take myself out of the here and now just in case....

Any ideas gratefully received
Hazza

January 14, 2000
1:11 pm
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hazza,
I can relate. I also had times when relaxation seemed far out and a dangerous place to go (because then I’d really start going at myself with negative self talk). But that was during „bad times“. I don’t feel afraid of relaxation at all during normal or good times, When times are very good I might find that relaxation feels boring. When you had bad panic attacs was that during your better times or during worse times? So is there some real reason from your personal history that makes you afraid of the good times? If you think about it you’ll propably find out that you have much more capacitiy to watch your own back when you are relaxed than when you put all your focus on your safety. Can you (during your good times) concentrate on something else? Then maybe this is a better way for you to start, like Les described it.

Do something really daring: feel safe! (I can spot the paradox, but I’m pretty sure you know what I mean). I normally feel safe when I relax, safer than before I relax. I let go of my thoughts and concentrate on my body, and I do something nice for my body (dancing, sauna, lying still and conciously relax the muscles, I find the lying still method most difficult). Most often I leave it at that. This improves how my body feels and my mood in general. Maybe you should try to relax your body and bring whith you the question „what would my safe place look like, smell like, feel like“? It’s only phantasy so you can make it as safe as you need it, even if you might think that some of your safety precautions are a bit over the top. Don’t forget the window, because you propably won’t feel safe whan you can’t overview your surroundings, but you can make the window as „bulletproof as you like“, and your own special entrance, and ..... And make sure you make up this place real good, it’s a good place to go.

Sometimes when I’m relaxed I can choose to let my thoughts wander (when I feel relaxed then my thoughts do what I choose until I tell them otherwise) from this relaxed state of mind and go to unexplored regions (I think this is meditation), where I can „bring“ a question or a topic with me, or I can just go and see what comes. This is often great, like a holyday for the soul. Sometimes I discover something that is sad, or painful, or even frightning, but I somehow remain aware that it’s a dreamlike sate I’m in and that I won’t get hurt. And those „unpleasant“ encounters are sometimes the ones that help me greatly. But remember: you can decide when and where, just being relaxed does not mean that everything else will follow automatically.

Isn’t it amazing that there are so many people out there who seem to have a problem with happiness (not: without hapiness). I’m one of them but constantly improving. 🙂

January 14, 2000
1:15 pm
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Les, welcome to the discussion.
You said tht you did meditaton on an emergency basis. How? As you might read out of my post to Hazza, I think that meditation has to do with letting the thoughts wander, yet you said you focus your mind. Focus on what (during meditation)? It surely sounds promising.

January 14, 2000
1:56 pm
Avatar
hazza
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Eve, thanks alot for your thoughts, you are right and my logical mind knows that. Tell the rest of me though!

You are right about my personal history, When i was younger I came home from school in a really happy mood, which is rare as i had a tough time at school, to find that my grandfather who i lived with had been rushed to hospital, he died later that night. The next time that happened was when i had just started a new job and again i came home unusually happy (it had always been rare for me to be very happy for no reason!) only to find that a close friend had died in a road accident. I do think that because on both occasions before i heard the news i was very relaxed and happy much more than usual, I know it is coincidence but right through my life i have seen good times be imediately followed by bad.

When i was younger i appeared in the local paper. I had had my bycicle stolen and a man can to our house anonymously and gave me some money for a new bike because he had read the story. I was really happy, but after a few days i had an obcene phone call obviously from someone who had seen the paper ( they used to print your name and address in those days by the article). SO again another example of not being able to have a good thing happen without a bad one following.

I have tried meditaion and visualisation, a few years ago that used to work quite well, now i find it absolutely impossible to imagine anything noce at all, my mind always finds the problems even in my imagination. The best way i have found of trying to relax in to concentrate on each of my muscles in turn and visualising them when i am going to sleep,

I did try t build a "garden" in my mind but i stared putting things i don't even like into my "garden" and now they are stuck there and i can't un-imagine them away again!!!

so I think i have to keep trying and keep telling myself why i find it hard to relax and that the reasons that stop me being able to are just bad luck. It doesn't mean something bad will happen if i relax, just because i have been relaxed before bad things have happen in the past.

So thanks for your suggestions I shall try them again and let you know.
Hazza

January 15, 2000
2:59 pm
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hazza, what I don't understand is that your logical part seems to understand safety, but your emotional part not? "Feeling safe" to me is something that brings a present to our emotional wellness, once you found a little bit of it, you will like it, and you will invite it again. Not in an addictive way, but because it feels truly good! It is only in addiction that we have to fear the things that give us pleasure, because they are destructive in the long turn. When we like something healthy (and feeling well IS HEALTHY)- there is no reason to fear it. And feeling safe won't ever be a steady state, because there are always bumps in the road ahead, but being free of fear is not something to be afraid of.

But I guess, that is a question that you are asking yourself, too. Sorry for not being helpful.
Eve

January 17, 2000
1:38 am
Avatar
Les
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Eve and Hazza,

Eve, re. meditation, I understand that in some forms of meditation, one simply lets one's mind wander. In other forms of meditation, one applies more discipline to the mind in terms of concentration. I have tried both, but have done more of the concentration methods. An example is a simple breathing meditation in which you are to concentrate on your breathing in and out, perhaps focussing on the feeling of the air going in and out of your nostrils. If you notice yourself thinking about anything else, you bring your attention back to the breathing. It is very difficult to do, but the feeling I get from it is very nice. After about 15 minutes of it, I feel at peace with myself, centered, and with a clear mind. It usually lasts for about an hour afterwards as well, slowly wearing off. But that is just my limited experience with it.

Hazza, you said that you found unpleasant things came into your garden when you imagined it while going to sleep. I have also had times when I was going to sleep, or in the middle of the night following a nightmare, when my mind was filled with negative feelings, thoughts, and images. Sometimes I even have felt that my mind was out of my control, and was stuck in this negative spiral. But I know that my thoughts are ultimately under my own control. So when I feel that way, I use a very forceful type of meditation to discipline my mind. It is sort of like in the movies, when someone is hysterical, and their friend slaps them in the face to get them to come out of it. I don't slap my own face, but I take forceful control of my mind. What I do then is to lay in bed on my back (I usually sleep on my side), take long controlled deep breaths, and concentrate only on the breathing. Any time my mind starts to think of something unpleasant, scarey, or bad, I immediately make it shut up and I concentrate on the breathing. I don't tell my mind "Shut up!!". I simply shut my mind up. What I mean is, I stop the thought, and in its place, I place my attention on the breathing. It is like pushing the "mute" button on the remote control when you are watching TV, or changing the channel.

Also, in the most extreme situations, I have found that the famous old chant "Ommmmmm" is very useful. This is a very simple sound, but it seems to have very profound effects on my mind and body, like music. I have found that simply saying the word "Ommmmmmmmmm..." until I run out of breath, greatly relaxes me, and helps me regain control of my mind. Sometimes I have to do it for 5 or 10 minutes. With each breath out, I say the word "Om" for the entire time I am exhaling. And I try to exhale for as long as possible (for example, 10-30 seconds). As I say the word "Om," my entire body begins to relax, and it becomes easier for me to say it for longer. Gradually, the tone of my voice becomes deeper and more relaxed, and I can feel a gentle smile coming over my face as I say it. After a while, when I feel relaxed enough, I gradually stop saying it, and switch to simply concentrating on my breath. Then, when I am peaceful and stable, I go back to sleep.

I have also found that saying "Om" is a good way to relax during the day in sitting meditation, especially when I am very very tense.

I am not a very experienced person with meditation, so you should take whatever I say with a large grain of salt. But I hope this is of some use to you.

Best wishes,

Les

January 17, 2000
6:17 am
Avatar
hazza
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Eve, and hi Les, nice to meet you, i am smiling at the thought of Om!

Thanks for taking the time to reply both of you.
Eve, it is not the the fear of feeling relaxed, it is the fear of the bads things that seem to happen when i am relaxed that is the problem, I know logically that being relaxed does not make bad things happen, it is just in my experience that has happened a LOT of times, like i said just bad luck really, ideally i would like a life with no bad things but hey, get real Hazza, its not going to happen! I do find that when im relaxed the knocks of life hit me harder at first because i was happy may be when i am relaxed i would just like it to last a little longer before it all comes crashing down again, i don't know....

Les, what you said about breathing etc, i do already and it does help when i am going to sleep. I too sleep on my side but will lie on my back and concentrate on breathing.
I also use the "stop" method. When i went to Canada a few months agao with nmy family it was Very hard for me, because i was jet lagged nervouse from the agoraphobia and being away from my "safe place" and i had just had an operation the day before and still had all the drugs from the anasthaetic in me. I would find myself totally zapped by major anxiety and racing thoughts of "what if..." So when it happens i just said to myself "let it come, let whatever this bad thing im feeling come, what ever happens i will cope" that took the power away from my fear and it helped alot. as they say we have nothing to fear but fear itself.
I also say STOP to myself when i feel my mind going on a negative spiral and that does help too,
Its just hard sometimes because i am afraid to let myself relax, but speaking with both of you has helped alot, It has reminded me that relaxation is hard to do and requires practice, and also reminded me that i should and do deserve to be able to relax.
Thank you both, very much

Les, i am a little afraid to try the om method, i think i would just start laughing at myself!! also may be my family would start calling the doctors! - its just a little too much for their British mentality!

Peace to you and yours, thanks again
Hazza

January 17, 2000
10:30 am
Avatar
eve
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hazza,

if you don’t "dare" to do the Omm-thing , try singing. But I must warn you: The exercises we did in our student choir for voice training did sound a lot worse than Omm ever could. Iguess it helped that we were a group, nobody was doing it alone. But voice training does give you a good excuse if anybody gives you odd looks because you make funny sounds :-),
Best wishes for you. eve

February 1, 2000
1:15 pm
Avatar
Les
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Hazza & Eve,

Re. being embarrassed to say "Om" outloud, I understand the feeling. I too have felt embarrassed saying it, especially if other people are in the house. But the great thing about this sound is that it seems to work no matter how softly you say it, so long as you can hear it in your mind. So, if you want to try it, but are feeling embarrassed about it, you might try just saying it very very lightly under your breath, or even imagining saying it, as you breath out during meditation. Why should it work when you only imagine saying it? Probably because, as numerous brain imaging studies have shown, imagining doing something uses many of the same brain areas as actually doing it does. The only difference I've noticed between imagining saying it, saying it under my breath, and saying it a bit louder, is that the act of actually vocalizing it seems to make the relaxation response to it more powerful.

As far as the British mentality goes on saying "Om," I don't know enough to judge what it is like. But I will say that the word "Om" has recently taken on some negative connotations in Japan, where my wife comes from. That is because of the stupid "Om Shinri Kyo" cult there (the ones who did the sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway). But even my wife knows that it is silly to associate the word "Om," which goes back thousands of years in Asian mysticism, with a stupid recent cult.

I must say that I am not a religious person, at least not in terms of following the ideas of any particular organized group. I have an aversion to regimenting my spiritual life according to some set belief system. But I am very open to exploring anything which seems to work on the spiritual level and which I can actually experience personally. And this simple little word, "Om" strikes me as being incredibly powerful, for whatever reason. If I were to hazard a wild guess, I would predict that uttering that sound might have an effect on one's brain waves, perhaps reducing the Betas and increasing the Alphas. Why this should be so, however, is unclear to me. But whatever the reason is, I think it is akin to the effect that certain music has on the mind, such that some types of music are found to be very relaxing by most people (e.g., slow, melodius, quiet music).

In any case, I wouldn't reject saying "Om" because of social embarrassment. The benefits of it, when I am feeling very stressed out, are just too great. On the other hand, as I said, doing it silently seems to work almost as well as saying it outloud.

Best wishes,

Les

February 1, 2000
1:30 pm
Avatar
infaith
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I teach meditation and meditation is miraculous in many ways, physically, emotionally and spiritually.
Om is a word of gratitude to our creator for all, it is a very powerful word for many reasons, none of which I am going to go into but I encourage the use of it.
Meditation has and does countless wonders for my health and happiness and the happiness of those who come in contact with me.
It puts us in touch with our authentic selves and with our creator. We find out what our real thoughts are and at this level we can alter them to suit our manifesting...
god bless

Forum Timezone: UTC -8

Most Users Ever Online: 247

Currently Online:
51 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

onedaythiswillpass: 1134

zarathustra: 562

StronginHim77: 453

free: 433

2013ways: 431

curious64: 408

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 49

Members: 109486

Moderators: 5

Admins: 3

Forum Stats:

Groups: 8

Forums: 74

Topics: 38532

Posts: 714181

Newest Members:

chip-xxx, rfvbkmrfVar, Denicedop, gtnhzyzVar, tourprofi, karateevsy2

Moderators: arochaIB: 1, devadmin: 9, Tincho: 0, Donn Gruta: 0, Germain Palacios: 0

Administrators: admin: 21, ShiningLight: 572, emily430: 29

Copyright © 2019 MH Sub I, LLC. All rights reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Health Disclaimer