Avatar
Please consider registering
guest
sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register
Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search
Forum Scope


Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
sp_TopicIcon
Childhood Abuse and Recovered Memory Therapy
October 1, 2006
11:07 pm
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have been through this form of "therapy." It just about killed me.

Good therapists seldom if ever tell their patients ...

"You have the symptoms of someone who was abused."

"Studies show that (or, my experience is that) most people with (fill in the particular diagnosis or symptoms here) were sexually abused."

"If you think you were abused, then you probably were."

"Remembering is essential if you want to be healed."

"This technique (hypnosis, guided imagery, sodium amytal, etc.) is designed to help you remember."

"Suing (forgiving, detaching from, etc.) your family is a necessary part of healing."

"You have to get worse before you get better."

“ Your body holds accurate memories of past events."

Statements That May Reflect Substandard Practices

Treating Patients with Memories of
Abuse: Legal Risk Management
Knapp, S.J. Ed. D. and VanderCreek, L. Ph.D.
American Psychological Association, 1999

October 1, 2006
11:09 pm
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

What are the symptoms of past sexual abuse?

" There is no uniform 'profile' or other method to accurately distinguish those who have sexually abused children from those who have not.."

American Psychiatric Association, Statement on Memories of Sexual Abuse, 1993.

"There is no single set of symptoms which automatically indicates that a person was a victim of childhood abuse. There have been media reports of therapists who state that people (particularly women) with a particular set of problems or symptoms must have been victims of childhood sexual abuse. There is not scientific evidence that supports this conclusion."

American Psychological Association, Questions and Answers about Memories of Childhood Abuse, 1995.
"Psychologists recognize that there is no constellation of symptoms which is diagnostic of child sexual abuse."

Canadian Psychological Association, Position Statement on Adult Recovered Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse, 1996.
"Previous sexual abuse in the absence of memories of these events cannot be diagnosed through a checklist of symptoms."

Royal College of Psychiatrists, Reported Recovered Memories of Sexual Abuse, 1997.

http://www.illinoisfms.org/index.html

October 1, 2006
11:12 pm
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Newsletter
Illinois-Wisconsin FMS Society

May 2005Vol. 11, no. 1

The loose screw awards

Psychology Today, in the Jan/Feb 2005 issue, gave “Loose screw” awards to psychology’s top 10 misguided ideas.“The mental health fields have, now and then, spawned and nurtured some completely crazy ideas.Physicians in the 18th and 19th centuries…inflicted strange and extremely cruel treatments on their mentally ill patients based on equally bizarre theories of human nature…

One of Psychology Today’s 10 loose screw awards went to recovered memory therapy.It termed this concept “The idea that launched a thousand suits.”It featured Pat Burgus and her horrible ordeal.“Burgus was one of many swept up in the ‘recovered memory’ craze of the 1980’s.

Zealous therapists encouraged clients to recall repressed memories of childhood abuse, leading to more than 800 lawsuits against alleged abusers between 1985 and 2000.Many of these resulted in incarcerations.

A few led to suicides.In most cases there was no corroborating evidence, and many accusers later recanted.”

After discussing Elizabeth Loftus’ work it concluded, “In other words, the source of many of the recovered memories was the therapist.”

...Once again there is the disturbing conclusion - how hard it is to get therapists to stop using these harmful methods.They also pointed out that “recovered memory therapy” is still being practiced.

Source:Psychology Today, Jan/Feb 2005, p.55.

http://www.illinoisfms.org/200505ar.html

October 2, 2006
12:32 am
Avatar
red blonde
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Worried_Dad

Not quite sure where you are going with this. Are you saying that anyone who had repressed memories of childhood (sexual) abuse and then recovered them when they were adult (children), that it is all a crock of XXXX? I would hate to think that you do think that! I am one of the survivors. But when I started remembering, a therapist had nothing to do with the recovering of memories. I had blocked out my memories, then I started having flashbacks, thought I was CRAZY, and it took me another 10 years before I even admitted to myself that the ABUSE had happened...and THEN I sought out a therapist because I had been on the verge of suicide. The flashbacks started after the physical abuse experienced with my first husband and got worse after my second husband who was also abusive.

Sure, there are cases where people have false memories and others that are so suggestable that they actually believe that they have been abused when they had not. Call it a sort of "Mass Histeria" if you like..because that DOES happen. I for one am not one of the two mentioned. I also helped leading group therapy sessions. But I never learned how to recogize an ABUSER, there are many forms of abuse. Read the thread "Let's Define Abuse". Some forms are so subtle, so insidious that you haven't a clue you are with one until they have sucked the life out of you. After being abused as a child, not having lead a NORMAL life, you tend not to know what is normal in adult life. I am STILL learning what NORMAL is.

I do not mean to sound like I am yelling at you. It is a touchy subject with me and I do get enraged when others do not believe that such abuses can happen to children and whose who also may have been abused as well are so in denial that they accuse others of being "fakes" or "flakes".

If you want to ask me questions, I will certainly try to answer them. Though it will only come from my own experience and through the experiences that I learned from others in the different group sessions that I helped to get together.

October 2, 2006
12:42 am
Avatar
lovetocrochet
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I don't know. I'm really on the fence about this.

I have not had a shred of therapy in over ten years. BUT I have had a number of memories resurface over time about abusive incidents. Nobody suggested them or implanted them into me.

They are real memories, things I could not possibly imagine or make up, and no book, resource or shrink is powerful enough to suggest them into my mind. I'm simply not that persuadable and with my autistic brain I'm wired a lot more concretely.

I truly do believe there are times the mind is not willing to remember something. I have talked to people who have blanked out things. They will remember terrible things leading up to something worse, then all of a sudden they're somewhere else hours or days later.

Yes, at the same time there are people who've had false memories implanted and it's resulted in tragedy. That's a slap in the face to the accuser, the accused, and to the system that has to handle excess lawsuits from it.

However, I don't think we can discount or invalidate some of the things the human mind does to cope... and frankly for every resource quoted here there are just as many if not more that can refute everything said. Psychology simply isn't an exact science.

Finally, as the daughter of a psychiatric nurse who later went into counseling (and who herself was very abusive), I can attest that the mental health industry is rife with bickering and politics between people who are arrogant and believe themselves to be above God. Therefore you're going to have a lot of people working very hard to discount one another and their findings... and be incapable of doing so without bias.

October 2, 2006
12:44 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

What makes you want to place all of these cut and pastes onto a thread for comment from others?

October 2, 2006
12:46 am
Avatar
lovetocrochet
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

For a jolly old gab at the round table?

October 2, 2006
1:28 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

hahaha! lovetocrochet you are a hoot! You sound as if you are from across the Pond.

October 2, 2006
1:53 am
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Of course there is a such a thing as traumatic amnesia.

But the issue of therapists who tell patients that they have signs of childhood abuse comes up from time to time.

This thread was more to raise awareness and maybe get some conversation going about a particularly destructive for of therapist malpractice--or worse, therapist malpractice combined with therapist abuse.

Some of you may know that I have a particularly sore spot about therapist abuse.

I think I went over it in the psychotherapy cults thread, but this is one form of therapist malpractice that I have personally experienced. Some days I don't feel like I really "survived" it though.

The screwy thing is that my therpaist used the hypnotic regression-suggestion thing not just on clients who reported or even had "signs" of abuse.

The entire therapy group was hypnotized at once--all together.

It was a darkened room with more than a dozen people all screaming in terror. For weeks and weeks and weeks.

It was horrible. Just horrible.

October 2, 2006
1:56 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Do you accept any responsibility for this experience?

October 2, 2006
2:02 am
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

The most innocent explanation I have for this therapist's behavior is that he just didn't know what the heck he was doing. And that he was on a "fishing expedition" to see which people in the group had been abused as children.

But it seemed like absolutely everyone in the group who went through that "therapy" turned out to have repressed memories of childhood abuse.

On my more cynical days I think the therapist just wanted to induce dependency and makes sure that we all had to spend a lot more time and money in therapy.

And part of me thinks the guy just got a kick out of watching all of us screaming our heads off.

October 2, 2006
2:05 am
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Devon,

Do you mean, did I trust people who referred me to the group and did I trust my therapist and did I pay money to attend the group?

In that case the answer is yes.

However, it is not only incorrect, but also wrong to conceptualize anyone who has been abused as having "responsibility" for their experience.

That is particulary true when you are talking about therapist abuse.

October 2, 2006
2:09 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have learned that, when I accept responsibility for doing something that I consented to that was later deemed foolish by me, I have an easier time of passing through it all. It is when I am still twisted up in the complicated emotions associated with blaming (which implies need for retribution or compensation...someone owes me something) that I make myself sick. This is true for anything that I have endured. It is actually my second victimization. The cycle has turned inward and become its own self-contained system. The way out for me is to do nothing. Let it pass. Life is too short.

October 2, 2006
2:14 am
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Devon,

I'm glad that works for you.

But you will want to be careful to never suggest to a person who has been abused that they bear even the slightest shred of "responsibility" for their experience.

Because that would be incorrect, and also wrong.

October 2, 2006
2:18 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think that this may be true for children to some degree, but not for adults. Adults have rights and free will and, if they willingly give that up to someone else, this is their choice.

October 2, 2006
2:19 am
Avatar
southgoingzax
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 79
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think people "blame" in different ways. Some people "give it to god" as a way of wiping their hands of it. I think it's less about accepting personal responsibilty for something that really wasn't your fault than about being able to expel the hurt and grieve in a way that is manageable and acceptable to you - then there is no need for retribution or compensation - I would say that it isn't unreasonable to expect a therapist to take care of your mental wellness, and not your fault if that therapist acts in a way that violates that wellness. How could it possibly be your fault? It is your responsibilty to remove yourself from the situation, once it is apparent the damage that is being done, and even, I would venture to say, your moral responsibilty to act so that others would not be hurt by the same therapists in the future, but to accept blame for something like that? I don't know.

October 2, 2006
2:27 am
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Devon,

Yes, I hear your opinion.

However, your viewpoint is not consistent with the consensual body of knowledge and standards of practice in the fields of medicine, psychotherapy, social work, or law.

October 2, 2006
2:38 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I can see your point of view, Zax...but consider the idea that this may be grounded in an assumption of consent to dependency on the healthcare provider.

What would this look like if it were a partnership rather than a paternalistic (or maternalistic)arrangement?

Certainly, if the therapist is not behaving ethically, one should stop getting care from this individual immediately and detail the behavior in writing and report it to the professional licensure board for an investigation.

Either do something or don't do something and own that choice for yourself and move on one way or the other. This is not to help protect the person who behaved unprofessionally, this is to protect you.

I, too, have had this experience. This was my way out of it. Keep it simple. Accept that I let myself get duped during a vulnerable time in my life and move on.

Everybody plays the fool sometimes. Life is way too short to spend the rest of it giving myself an ulcer over it.

You want to know something really funny? I lectured at one of the universities that my former therapist has affiliation with...and she just about fainted when she saw me. I could see her trying to see if it was really me. I was an uneducated blob of a depressed person when I knew her. Now I am an expert that speaks nationally. I just ignored her. Sometimes that is worse than attacking or playing into the game.

October 2, 2006
2:43 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

OK, WD. You have a right to buy that philosophy if you want to. It is your choice. Some caregivers really like to be the be-all to their patients...er uh...clients. Attorneys would certainly all agree with you. They make their living on this kind of thing: Keeping their clients stuck in the mire so that more services are required of them and more resources get used by them. It is just a game for them. You should hear them at their fancy restaurants at lunch time when they talk about their clients.

October 2, 2006
3:01 am
Avatar
red blonde
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Victims of abuse are not responsible for others abusing them. Because most adults, victims and abusers, are products of childhood abuse. It is essentially learned behavior and unless it is identified and worked on the cycle will repeat itself again and again and especially if the children of victims and abusers become victims. Unless the pattern is broken, and that part of the wounded psyche is healed, the victims of abuse will seek out what they are familiar with, usually over and over again. I know, I have been there and done that.

As for the therapist who hypnotized the whole group? Well, I think that was alittle crazy on his part. If I had been in that group that he hynotized, I would definitely asked the medical board whether that practice was condoned and, if not, have that therapist investigated for the motivation behind his action. I know that some maybe quacks. None of the groups that I was in or helped conduct (battered women and Adult survivors of childhood (sexual) abuse) ever did any hypnotism. Everyone had gone into therapy and the groups were recommended to show them that they are not alone that others have gone through, experienced what they have gone through and are working through it.
I wouldn't think that it was the best way to help people or to find out whether some had been abused because of the "mass hysteria" it can cause..I say mass hysteria but may not be the exact word I am looking for. Haven't you started yawning after someone else yawned in front of you? Like that, contagious reaction is some way. And you are not responsible for the irresponsible behavior exhibited by the therapist, even if you did agree to it. Just merely change therapists.
One that you would be more comfortable with. I would have found that to be very unacceptable, very uncomfortable. I also would have felt a lack of concern for the feelings of others. Healing has always been a gradual thing..Am I making any sense?

October 2, 2006
3:13 am
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Devon,

Umm...the philosophy I have "bought into" is the orthodoxy of the helping professions.

It is very strange to hear a fellow nurse speak the way you do about the subject of malpractice.

A patient is usually not in a position to assess whether or not the work of a helping professional is substandard or not.

It is the responsibility of the professional, not the patient to make sure that standards of best practice are followed.

And it is unethical for a professional to suggest otherwise.

October 2, 2006
3:14 am
Avatar
Worried_Dad
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 43
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi, red blonde

Yes, you are making perfect sense.

October 2, 2006
3:24 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I would agree that you are not responsible for the behavior of anyone else. You are responsible for your own behavior and decisions about how to respond to others behavior. This is why it makes sense to report the unethical individual to their licensing board and move on. Moving on is anything you decide it is.

For me, moving on was never seeking individual therapy again. I was looking for a mama to fix my life and she took full advantage of this and had other plans for me. I got duped, was really angry, and then I moved on. The gift this person gave me in a really twisted way was that my mama is never coming back and I need to grow up. It hurt, but I had to stand up on my own feet alone and get to know and love that person inside me. If I did not do this, I would surely meet her in another form and do this over again with someone else.

Here is how it goes for me: My mother's repeated cruelty set me up for this game in childhood. The therapist was just being herself and slid off of the precepts of her professional obligations to me as a dependent helpless individual in order to satisfy her own vanity. I short circuited the game by quitting altogether.

Life is a game. I choose to play the games I want to play and this isn't one of them...!

I really enjoy the games that I do choose to play...most of the time.

October 2, 2006
3:31 am
Avatar
Devon
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

WD: Patients assess a professional's standards of best practice all of the time. Why do you think we have JCAHO? The Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations is a consumer run organization that issues mandates to hospitals in large doses.

Patients are also a lot more well informed these days. The internet provides a lot of information about disease processes in lay persons' terms. "Informed patients" are telling the system how it is going to be.

We are required to tell every patient what their rights are. I do this in principle. I am there to serve them. They are the boss of their own healthcare. They can't start their own iv, but they have the right to tell me how many times I get to try before I have to get someone else to do it, if I am shooting blanks that day.

Healthcare is rapidly becoming a consumer run business....

October 2, 2006
9:42 am
Avatar
lovetocrochet
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

WD, thank you for clarifying your point of view and for sharing your story. I think what happened to you was horrid, I can't even imagine how that must haunt you.

I think there's a lot of other ways in which the psychotherapy profession can be incredibly incompetent. For example, a majority still claim that unless there's a certain age gap between siblings then any sexual interaction between them is just normal experimental play. I am one of those who ends up being invalidated and ignored when it comes to the abuse my brother heaped on me, because he's only a year and a half older. I refuse to believe I'm the only one.

He spent so many years hitting, humiliating, and intimidating me that by the time he started molesting me my "no" meant very little. It did not help that my mother bought into this hopswallow about "normal family experimentation" as well so she let him off, meaning he could continue to do as he pleased.

I will NEVER see him come to justice because of this bullcrap. My extended family won't even believe it. I do not understand to this day why there has to be a designated age difference between a victim/survivor and a perpetrator for anyone to see abuse as abuse and not just "fooling around" or "peer incest."

There are a few resources that recognize someone can be bigger or given more authority than they should, and in those cases an age difference is moot. There are also those who've done incest studies who acknowledge their information is incomplete, and maybe they "should have" included this or that. Can you even imagine, given this, what is being left out, and how much of this just might be based on preconceived notions?

My brother has always towered over me, and he was given as much power in our house as my parents. Saying no to him meant getting harassed, hit, screamed at, whatever it would take to make me give in. Sometimes I gave in quickly to get the torture over with faster... and much literature on incest out there will quickly concede that many times force isn't necessary because of the bond already present.

But I digress... all I know is that unless and until the attitude amongst most therapists change about this issue, I will not set foot in another counselor's office. I'm not going to be told yet one more time that I must have been a willing participant when I lay there, stiff as a board on my mother's side of the bed sick to my stomach with fear as he fondled my breasts, wondering how much further he'd take it and telling myself I have to find a way to make this stop, I have to tell my mother, brothers aren't supposed to do this...

Forum Timezone: UTC -8
Most Users Ever Online: 247
Currently Online:
28
Guest(s)
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
onedaythiswillpass: 1134
zarathustra: 562
StronginHim77: 453
free: 433
2013ways: 431
curious64: 408
Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 49
Members: 110914
Moderators: 5
Admins: 3
Forum Stats:
Groups: 8
Forums: 74
Topics: 38536
Posts: 714200
Newest Members:
Striker1s, marcusz, Keara, Venn, Jolebio, loni89
Moderators: arochaIB: 1, devadmin: 9, Tincho: 0, Donn Gruta: 0, Germain Palacios: 0
Administrators: admin: 21, ShiningLight: 572, emily430: 29

Copyright © 2019 MH Sub I, LLC. All rights reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Health Disclaimer