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bipolar vs depression
May 31, 2006
2:44 am
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pugs01
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Can someone give me examples of behaviors, not clinical definitions please, of true bipolar behaviour vs. someone who is depressed?

May 31, 2006
4:56 am
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cpt1212
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well a person who is bipolar will at sometime come out the depression and have manic episode, or a time in which they are very productive, talk very fast, don't need sleep, etc . . .they may cycle between these two stages very quickly (a matter of days) or at longer intervals (a couple of times a year)

June 1, 2006
6:05 am
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smarterone
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i dontknow which one i have,i now i am clinically depressed. wit and see.

June 1, 2006
6:19 am
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blyxx
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that's the thing about bipolarism... and it's also why it's difficult to treat because during each phase, the other symptoms are almost non-existent.

After the first page there is a second page if you press the "Next Page" at the bottom.
DSM IV Info
see also
Useful Info about Bipolar I and Bipolar II

It is less common to have Bipolar II, because it is an extreme case of depression or mania, nothing in between.

It takes time to diagnose either disorder, sometimes a person may be in one state or the other for years at a time. I hope this helps at all.

June 1, 2006
10:19 am
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wannamoveon
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hi i am new here and it seems this topic was here just in time for me.
i would really appreciate any feedback
on bi-polar..
my partner is bi-polar and every so often he speaks to me rudely /critical
and its impossible to reason with him as he is right and i am wrong.
well last night we had one of these episodes and he was so rude to me and accussed me of never following anything through and no wonder i had ne self esteem .
i was so angry i told him to****off
which really isant like me.
but now were not talking and i feel its all my fault even though he had been reall rude/critical to me throught out the day.
so its here we go again not talking for one day 5days or how ever long it goes on for .
is this normal with bi-polar for someone to ignore you

W

June 1, 2006
11:57 am
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cpt1212
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my dad is bi polar and after he was ectremely out of line he would act as if you didn't exist for days to weeks and the suddenly all would be forgotten and he would be exceptioinally funny and outgoing and did understand why you were not able to switch modes and respond to him in the same manner. i will write more later, just don't have time now.

June 1, 2006
12:22 pm
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lollipop3
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Hi Pugs,

Mania, generally speaking, would bring out symptoms that are the exact opposite of depression.

Someone who is depressed would exihibit symptoms such as.....

depressed mood, diminshished interest in activities, weightloss, insomnia or hypersomnia (too much sleep), fatigue, feelings of worthlessness, diminished ability to think or concentrate, thoughts of death, suicide, etc. etc.

Someone who is manic would exhibit symptoms such as....

inflated self-esteem (think they can do anything...been there,done that), decreased need for sleep (very little sleep WITHOUT feeling tired), more talkitive, racing thoughts, distracted very easily. Manic people can have sever moods swings from extremely happy go lucky to extremely moody and irritable. They have a tendency to do things to the extreme....drive recklessly, permiscuous(?) sex, public scenes, which very often lands them in jail or hospitalized. More often than not they DO NOT think they are at fault and will generally consider you crazy if you try to tell them their behavior is not normal. Because they do not think anything is wrong with them....they are VERY resistant to treatment.

Someone who is Bipolar would alternate between depression and manic episodes.

I hope this helped.

Lolli

June 1, 2006
12:26 pm
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lollipop3
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Hi Wanna,

I read your post here as well as on your other thread.

I posted the above information for you as well.

I realize that you may have acted in a way that you regret but that does not mean that you have done anything "wrong" or that you should feel guilty.

You reacted in a way that any normal human being would have reacted under the same circumstances.

Dealing with a Bipolar person is extremely difficult. The way he acts is absolutely, postively NOT YOUR FAULT, so please, do not blame yourself.

Take care,
Lolli

June 1, 2006
2:24 pm
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camra
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Hummm, interesting post, I wonder if all those hippies back in the 50ties were bipolar???? Since the behavour you just described fits them to a tee.

Things that make ya go humm,,,,

camra

June 1, 2006
2:50 pm
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Randomwomen2
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Ahh Im bipolar. It hasnt effected me much while im pregnant for some reason though. I remember thinking that I just had insomnia for a week at a time then the other weeks I would sleep way too much. It is really hard to determine. OOps sorry got to go baby crying.

June 1, 2006
2:52 pm
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ConfusedCyn
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One quick note - in atypical bipolar disorder, the manic phase is characterized by anger, irritation, acting out, etc. The DSM term for this is dyphoria. People who suffer from atypical bipolar may often be mis-diagnosed because they usually do not have the 'highs' of classic mania, although depression is usually clearly present (sometimes simultaneously).

Also, if a person truly suffers from bipolar, they can be rapid-cycling, which means that their moods may swing from up to down and back again within very short periods of time.

My husband suffers from this disorder and was mis-diagnosed for 10 years. If anyone thinks they have this disorder they should try to find a psychiatrist who is very experienced with all types of bipolar in order to get a confirmed diagnosis.

My husband now takes meds and has only very brief periods of depression or dysphoria that are brought on by stress and are usually mild.

Hope this helps!

CC

June 1, 2006
3:54 pm
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Randomwomen2
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I was diagniosed my by phylogist after beeing miss diagnosed for years of just having dipression

June 2, 2006
10:41 am
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pugs01
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Is it possible for the mania periods to be confused with narcissist type complex.

June 2, 2006
11:52 am
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wannamoveon
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cpt
thankyou so much for your reply much appreciated if you have anymore on this ignoring blanking not talking to me it would really be appreciated he still isant talking to me like ive done something major did he not take into account how rude he was all day
and how i had to take that,
i feel rezlly cornered right now as im not going to say sorry not after his abuse but also at the same time its making me feel like crap not talking to him .w

June 2, 2006
12:04 pm
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wannamoveon
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camra thankyou for you reply i still feel like its my fault why
we had a lovely weekend then he was so off with me like he hates me i dont understand why its like we never had a nice time at all
w

June 2, 2006
12:05 pm
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wannamoveon
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lolli thanks

June 2, 2006
3:57 pm
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lollipop3
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Hi Pugs,

Yes, it is possible. Many symptoms/behaviors of a manic episode have narcissistic qualities to them.

If you don't mind me asking.....are you asking for yourself.....or are you asking in regards to someone else?

Lolli

June 2, 2006
4:01 pm
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lollipop3
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Camra,

LOL.....

If I had to take a guess I would say that Hippies were probably not Bipolar as much as they were just plain high.

LSD can make ya do some pretty strange things.

June 4, 2006
3:41 am
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camra
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Ok all seriousness aside, LOL yep your right that stuff can make ya whaky, but I was just saying perhaps we should not call it bipoalar , maybe we should call it the hippi syndorme.... ROTFL,,,

(im just joking of course)

trying to make everyone laugh : )

June 5, 2006
12:22 pm
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pugs01
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Thanks lolli, I am actually asking for someone else. I think they could utilize some therapy, have noticed some self destructive traits and am trying to figure it out. How does one get one help if they dont have a problem?

June 5, 2006
12:40 pm
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lollipop3
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Pugs,

You asked: "How does one get one help if they dont have a problem?"

The short answer.....you don't.

Unfortunately, you cannot "get" anyone help that does not want it or who doesn't think they need it.

It is a no win situation that will have you questioning your own sanity by the time all is said and done.

The best suggestion I can give is to detach yourself from the situation and let it go.

When I say detach, I don't necessarily mean detach from the PERSON (although at times that may be necessary) but to detach from trying to "fix" that person.

I would also suggest educating yourself on the issue as much as possible for your own sake. The more you learn about the disorder, the more you will be able to recongnize what is not within your control (which is basically anyone's behavior but your own).

I hope that I don't insult you by saying this, as that is not my intention, but the fact that you are trying to find out about and "help" another person with their own problems and behavior could be considered "codependent". It may also do you well to educate yourself on the subject of codependency and see if it applies to you. Very often we try to "help" (i.e. control) others in a subconscious effort to avoid helping ourselves.

I know first hand how hard it is to watch someone that we love or care about do things that may be harmful to themselves, but the best thing you can do for them and for yourself is to just keep the focus on the things you can control....which is you.

I hope this helped.

Good luck,
Lolli

June 5, 2006
2:13 pm
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pugs01
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You have helped, very much thsnks lolli. Will try the detachment. Although my life hangs in this relationship also.

June 5, 2006
5:03 pm
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lollipop3
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Pugs,

I don't know the nature of your relationship (husband, b/f, child?), but I do understand very well what you mean when you say that your life "hangs in the relationship."

Believe me, I know that my suggestion falls in the category of "easier said than done" but I also know that trying to fix or control the behavior of someone else is not only futile but will more than likely make the situation worse.

Again, I wish you good luck.

Lolli

June 6, 2006
2:19 am
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camra
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June 6, 2006
5:54 am
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Mardoll
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As usual, when I see a list of symptoms, I stop and check to see if they apply to me.

This is expecially true of Bipolar and Schizophrenic disorders, since they run in my family.

I've long since concluded that I have no significant schizophrenic traits, really, but it occasionally occurs to me to worry that I might be a really slow kind of bipolar...

You say sleeping too much followed by not sleeping enough? Is the not sleeping enough a mania thing?

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