Avatar
Please consider registering
guest
sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register
Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search
Forum Scope


Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
sp_TopicIcon
Anyone's Kid Take Stratera?
September 4, 2005
5:28 pm
Avatar
luv2luvher
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think that is how you spell it. I am thinking of putting my son on Stratera. It is the non-narcotic for ADD/ADHD. My sister has your child on it and she said it didn't help him so now she has moved over to the stronger one. But she told me I could put him on the Stratera for about a month and see if it helps him control his behavior at school. I am totally against putting my child on drugs, but I have tried everything from grounding to yelling at him and nothing is getting through to him. Any opinions or information would be much appreciated.

Much Luv,
Luv2

September 4, 2005
5:45 pm
Avatar
alyssa
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

How old is your son

September 4, 2005
6:09 pm
Avatar
SUSIE BABY
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

HEY LUV, my son who is now 15 is A.D.H.D.,BREATH!! i started my son on RIDLIN when he was in first grade, went from 5 miligram's to 20 in no time,then switched him to ADERAL,same thing,start off low dose go higher ect.... I TOOK HIM OFF EVERYTHING!!! it's been aprox. 7 year's no med's.i did my research on this,it's alot to do with diet,for some reason ANY THING WITH RED DYE set's them reeling like a sugar high! does school know your child is a.d.h.d.?? DO NOT LET SCHOOL INVOLVED! BUT, have them test him,then stay on them to rest assure he get's an education. i've faught for year's for my son to be where he NEED'S to be. read the side effect's of any thing you give your child. when my son was on ADERAL one of the possible side effect's were "MENTAL LIBILITY". what the hell is that? i'll tell you what i took me a couple month's to find out. one minute their happy as clam's,the next they want to RIP your head off!! here we are how many year's later,and how many children have KILLED THEM SELVE'S? ALOT!! i didn't understand why LISA MARIE PRESLEY AND KIRSTY ALLEY were on the step's of the WHITE HOUSE protesting againt's giving our kid's DRUG'S. I KNOW NOW. canada has pulled this drug off their shelve's,THE GOOD OLE U.S.A. FEEL'S IT'S SAFE ENOUGH TO KEEP!. i wish you "ALL" the luck in the world.you will make it through this,i have to be very stern with mine,these children have a way of pushing harder than the usual child. do your home work mom,STAY AWAY FROM MED.S!! SUSAN

September 4, 2005
7:40 pm
Avatar
CODA_Mom
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

luv,

I don't have any of my own kids on Stratera, but my understanding about ADD/ADHD meds is that they normally start taking effect immediately. You will know within a day or so whether or not it will make a difference in his behavior.

You may want to consider having something called a "neuropsych assessment" done on him before you go the medication route. This is an evaluation of the child's nervous system functioning, and is normally done by a psychologist or a child psychiatrist (you can ask your family doctor for a referral to one). This evaluation should clear up any questions you have about his behavior.

ADD/ADHD are disorders of the nervous system and are not easy for a child to control on their own. The child with ADD/ADHD needs the help of a patient, involved parent to keep them organized, focused and unconditionally loved. They are usually not the most popular kids at school because they are drawn into arguments easily and have difficulty with social skills...they have a hard time seeing things from another's point of view and are usually terribly misunderstood by everyone.

Other things you can check are, as Susie suggested, his diet (no caffeine, no dyes, sufficient protein), his living habits (too much tv, or computer games, video games?) and one other important thing...his anxiety level. ADHD looks a lot like high anxiety in kids. They are like little conduits, taking in all of the stress around them.

If he does seem highly anxious, try spending some one-on-one, father-son time with him and let him do most of the talking, even if it drives you crazy (if he's anxious or ADHD, he'll probably be a little "motor-mouth" anyway :). You'll learn all about what his fears are that are making him act the way he does.

I know I've gone on and on, sorry. Hope some of it helps.

September 4, 2005
8:36 pm
Avatar
Matteo
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

luv2luvher, please listen to SUSIE BABY ! There are thousands if not millions of children, some of them adults now, who are being medicated most of their lives. Not that long time ago nobody heard about ADHD, and majority of those, who today surely would be diagnosed with ADD or ADHD grew up to become productive members of the society without any medication. Your son deserves better, maybe more difficult, but definitively less harmful approach than being medicated. Good Luck!

September 5, 2005
1:56 am
Avatar
EJ
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi Luv,

I know no one likes to put a child on medication, but untreated ADHD kids are more likely to drop out of school and get into legal trouble than other kids, so not using medication can be a risk, too.

My son's on Adderall, extended release, and it has been wonderful. All of a sudden, his executive function - the part of his brain that allowed him to control himself and to anticipate the consequences of his actions - woke up and he could concentrate, organize himself, think before he spoke or acted, consider his behavior rather than just act impulsively. He's no saint, but he's so much better off on the medication. I know that without it, I would not want to even think about letting him drive in a few years.

We tried Strattera and it didn't work very well for my son. Doesn't mean it wouldn't be right for yours. There are a lot of different medications you can try, so if you decide to go ahead, just be prepared to spend some time trying different prescriptions at different doses before you get the one that works well with the fewest side effects. Also, be aware that when your child grows a little bit, all of a sudden his current dose may be insufficient and he'll need a little more.

Best of luck to you. I say, if you don't absolutely have to use medication, don't do it. But if medicine is going to make the difference between your kid being a happy, healthy kid who gets his work done and only gets into the normal amout of trouble, or his being constantly in trouble, unable to concetrate, getting terrible grades with his self-esteem in the sewer, then thank God for the drug companies and do for him what you would want someone to do for you if you were the kid.

My two cents . . .
Good luck
EJ

September 5, 2005
6:10 am
Avatar
SusieQ
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

EJ says it great.

There are lots of good suggestions here for helping your son -- looking at all the different factors that can look like or affect ADD. If your child is ADD (and even if he wasn't) diet, living habits, love, support, helping with focus and organization, discipline are always beneficial but medicine can help sometimes too.

I have ADD and went for years and years with no medication. I am a productive member of society. I am able to "control" most of my ADD behavior. But life has been very hard -- hard in ways that people don't see or understand. For me the greatest or hardest thing to deal with has been having so much happenning inside my head at the same time. This often causes much of the distraction and acting out behavior we see people with ADD. It has only been recently that I have taken medication (Strattera) for ADD. I cannot convey the positive impact it has made on my life. It doesn't solve everything. I still have to "do" things to make life livable and easier for others (organization, focus, behavior techniques) but the change in being able to concentrate and focus has made a profound impact on my life externally and most importantly internally. I am definitely less angry and frustrated and MUCH more happy and calm.

Not all medications and dosages work for everyone, especially kids as they are still developing. Strattera is great because it is a non-stimulant, few to no side effects and it starts to work quickly. I noticed a slight change within a week and significant change within a month.

Medication isn't the end all be all. It's just another tool that has the possibility of helping people with ADD have a happier, more productive and less stressful life. For me, I only wish I had this medication when I was a kid. It would have made life easier, probably for my parents too! 😉

Wishing the best for your son and for you!

September 5, 2005
6:46 am
Avatar
Neshema
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

ya know...here is something to ponder...just how does one get diagnosed as ADD? I actually know something about this. Yes, there are neuropsychologists out there, and yes there are all kinds of published tests on the marked for them to buy, but do they really know whether the tests are reliable and valid? That is, are the results consistent, and does the test measure what it claims to measure? FYI, the measurement of ADD is a tricky business, and not everyone can agree as how it should be measured, yet all kinds of people seem to qualify for the label nowadays. Clinical judgment can be even less reliable. Just thought consumers should be aware.

September 5, 2005
7:46 am
Avatar
CODA_Mom
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Good thoughts, Neshema. I've often thought that neuropsychs are great to have, but when I want to find out if one of my child clients has ADD/ADHD, I send out 1" thick questionnaires to their parents, teachers, coaches, etc., to track their behavior over time.

One cannot absolutely diagnose this during a one-hour test and be absolutely certain they have ADD/ADHD. The neuropsych combined with parental and teacher input would be the best indicator, in my opinion. The neuropsych is a good start, but should always go hand-in-hand with everyday behavior.

My daughter (who is now 20) has always had ADD traits. She has never been diagnosed, but had all of the behaviors. We never had her on drugs, but chose to work from a behavioral perspective instead, including homeschooling her to get her able to graduate high school (she graduated with honors when she was put back in). To be honest, it was h*** at times. I had to make lists of her positive qualities and keep it handy at all times. I prayed, cried, had panic attacks, pulled my hair out, etc., etc., but was bull-headed and stubborn enough (or brain-dead) to hang in there.

These kids are bright, energetic, lively, oppositional and can drive parents crazy, and I think that God uses them to keep parents from being too rigid and serious (you HAVE to develop a sense of humor to survive).

Good thought-provoking points, thanks!

September 5, 2005
10:21 am
Avatar
Anonymous
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

there are plenty of meds for ADHD - you will need a total work up from his pediatrician or a psychiatrist before you "try" anything.

there are lots of paperwork and interviews to go thru - the school must fill it out, the parents and the kids.

***IF*** they don't require this - RUN - go find a doc that goes thru ALL the testing before trying a med.

each med has a different side effect and different effect on the ADHD - each child needs a different type of meds - there is no 'one size fits all' answer to this.

my daughter is 11, she tried concerta, strattera and eventually ended up on wellbutrin - cuz her ADD is based on the same brain chemical as depression - she is ADD inattentive type.

your son needs to be diagnosed, then try meds - just remember, the same med doesn't work on everyone.

keep in mind - strattera causes stomach upset - I am on it - and when I first started on it - I had horrible nausea - I had to time it right - in the middle of a meal - after a meal was too late and before was too early.
my daughter had the same issues. I had to take maalox liquid on the worst days.

good luck...and don't be afraid of meds.

oh - and a therapist is also a good idea, to help with the depression, the social skills that most kids with ADHD lack and the coping skills with "life" issues and how to manage ADHD.

read - there are lots of books out there - look in the library - I just got a handful cuz I have to help my daughter thru the first part of middle school, which promises to be a challenge.

September 5, 2005
11:27 am
Avatar
SUSIE BABY
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

hey,just want to respond, my son,when he was in 7th grade went OFF the scale's.this is when puberty hit! all those hormone's on TOP of his a.d.h.d. long story short,he failed.i was ay my wit's END!!! i got "US" in a program that deal's with,anger,peer presure,possible drug use( these children are more likely to use). "WE" delt with these issue's together. just letting him know "I'M" here for you no matter what. up date,because i stay on top of school,they came to relize what a smart boy i have,he was moved up in the middle of the school year( to 8th) and is now in 9th, ON NO MED'S. PLEASE, don't just listen to all the GOOD these drug's do,they don't effect everyone the same.isn't anyone reading this (or taking)wondering why U.S.A. STILL SELL'S ADDERALL,BUT CANADA "PULLED" IT FROM IT'S SHELVE'S? MY SON ENDED UP ON MED'S. BECAUSE I LISTENED TO PEOPLE TELL ME IT'S WHAT HE "NEED'S". NOT!!! KEEP THE FAITH,SUSAN

September 5, 2005
12:08 pm
Avatar
StronginHim77
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 453
Member Since:
September 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I am the mother of two sons, both with ADHD. One has acute hyperactivity; the younger falls into the "moderate" hyperactivity range. For over two decades, I have studied ADHD, worked closely with doctors, psychiatrists and school specialists regarding the special needs of these kids. On a personal note, I have tried homeschooling (and regular school attendance), medication (and suspension of meds) and counseling/therapy for both boys. As a result of my deep commitment to the needs of ADHD children, I have served for the past 4 years as the ADHD/504 Parent Advocate for my School District in South Florida.

Here is the best, most un-biased advice I can give you on the hotly-debated medication vs. no medication issue:

Did you ever make a battery in science class? Remember how we assembled stacks of copper pennies, bound them with conductive wire, then lowered them into a mason jar? However, the electricity generated by these homemade batteries could not travel through the stacks of pennies without an additional KEY INGREDIENT: a fluid (water) had to be poured into the jar, covering the penny stacks. Then the electric impulse was conducted from the top of the stack to the bottom.

OK. The human brain is similar to those mason jar batteries. It is composed of stacks of "neuro-transmitters." These stacks are surrounded by fluid which enables the thought processes to transmit from top to bottom of the neuro-transmitteres. If something is "missing" or "awry" in that conductive fluid, the thought cannot successfully travel throughout the entire stack.

When a person with ADHD is given certain medications, the fluid surrounding these neuro-transmitter stacks is "corrected," enabling the thought to transmit correctly, reaching the necessary "end point." Without corrective medication, this is virtually impossible for the person with ADHD. In short, these medications do not "drug" the child. Rather, they enable the child's thought processes to flow correctly and efficiently, from beginning to conclusion, sometimes for the first time in their lives!

Denying a child with ADHD the appropriate medication (and sometimes, it takes some experimentation to select the drug/dosage best-suited to the individual, due to the uniqueness of our brain chemistries) is -- in my opinion and experience -- denying them a shot at functioning with some degree of normalcy, hence feeling better about themselves. Most of these kids have tremendously low levels of self-esteem, due to hearing nothing but "negatives" for years, particularly in the areas of controlling impulsive behaviors and academic concentration/performance.
It is so important to do everything possible to accommodate their disability and give them every tool for overcoming it and going on to lead productive lives.

My younger son is currently on Concerta (a time-release Ritalin). He is a high school junior now. When unmedicated, he was failing many subjects, unable to focus (remember, that this disorder is an ATTENTION DEFICIT). Medicated, he is now maintaining a 3.6 GPA (straight A's & B's), ranks in the top 5% of the State on his FCAT exams (for standardized performance achievement) and is headed for full college scholarships.

We have also supported him with great structure on the home front, a carefully written 504 Plan (drawn up by his parent/teacher/504 Designee team) which is fully implemented and updated each year, to accommodate his progress and varying needs, and alot of prayer and encouragement on the home front.

This is the best advice I can share. I hope it sheds some perspective that will prove helpful to you and your precious child.

September 5, 2005
4:18 pm
Avatar
StronginHim77
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 453
Member Since:
September 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

To Neshema:

A diagnosis of ADD/ADHD is made by a careful gathering of data from parents/spouses/teachers and doctors. There is no "blood test," etc. for a quick, simple and definitive diagnosis. For young children the input of both the at-home mother/caretaker, as well as supervisory adults in any structured setting (preschool,Sunday school, daycare, etc.) are crucially important. Data is accumulated and evaluated over a period of time under various "settings" of external stimuli, focusing requirements, etc. Interestingly enough, fathers of ADD/ADHD are statistically and historically more opposed to such a diagnosis in their offspring. Some plausible explanations for this "denial" in the male parent include the prevelance of a genetic transmission from male parent to male offspring, particularly in ADHD children (Attention Deficit Disorder WITH Hyperactivity). Boys with ADD/ADHD outnumber girls. Fathers with ADD/ADHD outnumber mothers. Usually, the mother becomes the "heavy" who must contend with the high maintenance behavior and difficulties of these children. Consequently, many of the mothers "burn out" and need counseling, sympathy and support to continue in the challenging (and exhausting) task of raising these special needs children.

Above all, it is important to remember that Attention Deficit Disorder (with OR without hyperactivity) is not a discipline problem (i.e., failure of the parent)or an attitude problem (something little Johnny could control if he WANTED to); it is a physiological-based, cognitive processing disorder, totally beyond the control of either parent OR child. These children (and their parents) need medical/educational and behavioral modification support, to overcome their disability and grow into successful, happy adults with good self-esteem levels.

September 6, 2005
4:58 pm
Avatar
StronginHim77
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 453
Member Since:
September 30, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

P.S. I do not personally know any ADD/ADHD patients who have done well on Stratera. Most seem to do better on either Adderall or Concerta. These seem most effective at correcting the chemical imbalance in the frontal lobe area of the brain.

September 6, 2005
7:56 pm
Avatar
basketcase
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hey Luv. My son takes Adderall. He is 10 years old, and very much ADHD! I've had good results with the Adderall, although, with his ADHD, is coupled with severe emotional/aggressive actions for which he takes Risperdal. This, I hate, because Risperdal is actually an anti=psychotic used to treat schizophrenia! It has helped, but I have looked into alternatives. Diet does play a large part. Cutting back on the sugars and preservatives may help. I am trying to do that with my son, buying more organics, health food type snacks, wheat instead of white, etc. I have also checked out an alternative "medication" called Attend. It's actually an herbal supplement. There is a website with alot of information on that plus other supplements for attentional/emotional issues. I haven't tried it yet, but sounds interesting. I agree with the others here about getting the right testing done on your son. Also, if you do make the decision to use medication, try to find a doctor that actually talks to you and your son, not just prescribes medication. Good luck.

September 6, 2005
9:18 pm
Avatar
Anonymous
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I found that my daughter did well with a DHA supplement - they make it with a strawberry essence and in tiny form so it's easy for kids to swallow and no fishy burps afterwards, gonna look into getting more and see if it helps.

I have heard of attend - tho didn't try it cuz the supplement I found had higher doses of DHA which is said to elevate mood and concentration in children.

the FDA is currently trying to figure out a way to ADD DHA to milk or osmething that most kids consume because their diet is lacking and it DOES cause learning issues if not enough is consumed.

lower carb and higher protein diet is also said to help - but don't change anything without doctor's guidance.

September 7, 2005
11:22 am
Avatar
gayle
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

My son is 10 andhas been on Strattera since he was 8. It works for him. When he started taking it it was really new and I was told by his Dr last year that it really only works on a small percentage of kids. I notice a difference in him if he doesn't take his meds. On them, he is calm, gets his work done at school, follows directions much better and the amt he takes is based on his weight, there is no guess work on the perscription. I had him tested by a psychologist for ADHD and then took those results to his Dr and went from there. I never wanted to put my child on medication like that but after seeing the positive difference in him we were hooked!

September 7, 2005
9:20 pm
Avatar
basketcase
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 24, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Whew! Had a day today where the ADHD came out with my son! Apparently, he forgot to take his medicine this morning!!!! My bad.....I told him to brush his teeth and take his medicine. Shouldn't have given him 2 directions at once before he had his meds...lol. He did the teeth-brushing, forgot the meds. He's been wound up this afternoon, though. Another reason to help me feel better about my decision to keep him on his meds. Just seeing the difference it makes is amazing. He is so much more calm and focused when he takes it. Homework this afternoon took FOREVER! I will definitely make sure he gets it tomorrow.

September 11, 2005
2:39 am
Avatar
DandyLion
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 27, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have a cousin who is on it and the only problem it seems to cause with him is he has no appetite so he is incredibly skinny. It is a much needed and massive help for him. Hope this helps!

September 11, 2005
4:49 am
Avatar
SoulSpirit
New Member
Members
Forum Posts: -1
Member Since:
September 29, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I have a daughter who is 13, and was clinically diagnosed by a psychiatrist with ADD. This was discovered while in Kindergarten. She was originally evaluated by our family doctor, and we began low doses of adderall. At that time, the extended release adderall didn't exist. After an exensive weight loss, we tried concerta, and straterra. We have wrestled with weight gain, weight loss, and how to keep her body stable and allow it the full opportunity to grow without hindering the help her brain needs. I relate ADD and ADHD to someone who has diabetes, and needs insulin.

After realizing that the family doctor was not getting it right, we turned to a psychatrist. After her evalulation as well as input from teachers and other academically involved adults, her meds were nearly doubled. Currently, she takes 30 MG of adderall xr, AND 80 mg of Strattera. Adderall causes her to lose weight quickly, and strattera, causes her to gain weight quickly. A combination of the two has worked very well for us.

My daughter is very intelligent, her brain just does not allow her the opportunity to focus, think clearly, and utilize the knowlege she has.

On the other hand, my step son, has also been diagnoised, but with ADHD. His mother refuses to medicate him, thus in my mind, setting the boy up for failure. He can't carry on a normal conversation with anyone because he can't draw the information from his brain and verbailize. When he is on medication, he can communicate effectively, and actually is very bright.

It is also a known fact, that televion, and video games only assist children of both diseases in escaping to the mental world they escape to, and allow them not to use their brains. Television in our home is very limited, as well as supervised.

The difference in the two children in my life, one medicated and the other one not, is more than visible. Both these children are 13, (7 weeks apart actually), and the one who is not medicated (his mother's choice) is being set up for failure, and as a step parent, it is most difficult to watch. His father has no input, thus allowing the mother to be blind to his mental needs. I can see, based on the input into this brain as a result of friends, television, etc., that this family is headed for issues as the boy grows older. Responsibility and self accountability is not part of the rearing process, coupled with untreated ADHD, has all the earmarks of major life issues down the road.

Whether to treat or not to treat with medicine is a parental choice. Do your homework before making a decision, there are numerous studies out there on the internet, and some by the National Institute of Health. Read, ask questions, and involve a physciatrist (sp). THEN make your decision.

Without the medications, my daughter would be floundering in life, I am thankful they are available.

Forum Timezone: UTC -8
Most Users Ever Online: 349
Currently Online:
29
Guest(s)
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
onedaythiswillpass: 1134
zarathustra: 562
StronginHim77: 453
free: 433
2013ways: 431
curious64: 408
Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 49
Members: 110976
Moderators: 5
Admins: 3
Forum Stats:
Groups: 8
Forums: 74
Topics: 38561
Posts: 714258
Newest Members:
nina1985, February, lisabaker, robertwalker, Why.., Why.
Moderators: arochaIB: 1, devadmin: 9, Tincho: 0, Donn Gruta: 0, Germain Palacios: 0
Administrators: admin: 21, ShiningLight: 572, emily430: 29

Copyright © 2020 MH Sub I, LLC. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Health Disclaimer | Do Not Sell My Personal Information