You must be logged in to post Login Register


Register? | Lost Your Password?

Search Forums:


 






Wildcard Usage:
*    matches any number of characters
%    matches exactly one character

Questionnaire: Are You Being Emotionally Abused?

UserPost

10:13 pm
December 6, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

Hi guys,

I found this quiz in a book entitled ‘The Emotionally Abusive Relationship’.

The author, Beverly Engle, proposes that emotional abuse is a major epidemic in our culture, but also the least understood form of abuse. She believes that very few people know what constitutes emotional abuse and fewer understand the consequences that it has on their lives.

Emotional abuse is much more than verbal abuse.

Emotional abuse can be defined as any nonphysical behavior or attitude that is designed to control, intimidate, subjugate, demean, punish, or isolate another person. There are even physical forms of emotional abuse, which can be considered ‘symbolic violence’, such as slamming doors, kicking a wall, throwing dishes, furniture or other objects, driving recklessly while the victim is in the car, and destroying or threatening to destroy objects the victim values, shaking fist, making threatening gestures or faces, acting like her or she wants to kill the victim.

How is Emotional Abuse Damaging? It can cause depression, lack of motivation, confusion, difficulty concentrating or making decisions, low self-esteem, and feelings of failure or worthlessness. It systematically wears away at the victim’s self confidence, sense of self-worth, thrust in his or her perceptions and self concept.

Questionnaire: Are You Being Emotionally Abused?
Answer the following questions to help determine weather or not you are being emotionally abused in your relationship.

1. Do you feel as if your partner treats you like a child? Does he constantly correct you or chastise you because your behavior is “inappropriate”? Do you feel you must “get permission” before going somewhere or before making even the smallest decisions? Do you have to account for any money you spend, or does he attempt to control your spending (even through he has no problem spending on himself)?

2. Does your partner treat you as if you are “less than” or inferior to her? Does your partner make a point f reminding you that you are less educated or that you make less money or that you aren’t as attractive as she is?

3. Does your partner routinely ridicule, dismiss, or disregard your opinions, thoughts, suggestions, and feelings?

4. Does your partner constantly belittle our accomplishments, your aspirations, or your plans for the future?

5. Do you find yourself “walking on eggshells?” Do you spend a lot of time monitoring our behavior and/or watching for your partner’s bad moods before bringing up a subject?

6. Have you stopped seeing many or all of your friends and/or family since being in this relationship? Did you do this because your partner dislikes them, because your partner feels jealous of the time you spend with them, or because you are ashamed of the way he treats you in front of them? Did you stop seeing friends and family because you are ashamed of the fact that you’re still with hi, even though you’ve complained to them many times about the way he treats you?

7. Does your partner usually insist on getting her own way? Does she want to be the one to decide where you will go, what you will do, and whom you will do it?

8. Does your partner punish you by pouting, by withdrawing from you, by giving you the silent treatment, or by withholding affections or sex if you don’t do things his way?

9. Does your partner frequently threaten to end the relationship if you don’t do things her way?

10:13 pm
December 6, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

10. Does your partner constantly accuse you of flirting or having affairs even though it isn’t true?

11. Does your partner feel he or she is always right?

12. Does your partner seem impossible to please? Does she constantly complaint to you about some aspect of your personality, your looks, or the way you choose to run your life?

13. Does your partner frequently put you down or make fun of you in front of others?

14. Does your partner blame you for his or her problems? For example, does he claim it is your fault he flies off the handle and starts screaming? Are you to blame for her problems with compulsive overeating? Because she has a drinking problem? Does he blame you for not being able to finish college or fulfill his dream of becoming and actor (author, musician, singer, etc)?

15. Does your partner feel you are the one who is responsible for all the problems in the relationship?

16. Does your partner’s personality seem to go through radical changes? Is she pleasant one minute only to be furious the next? Does he become enraged with only the slightest provocation? Does she experience periods of extreme elation followed b periods of severe depression? Does his personality seem to change when he dinks alcohol?

17. Does your partner tease you, make fun of you or use sarcasm as a way to put you down or degrade you? When you complain, does he tell you it was just a joke and that you are too sensitive or don’t have a sense of humor?

18. Is your partner unable to laugh at herself? Is he extremely sensitive when it comes to others making fun of her or making any kind of comment that seems to show lack of respect?

19. Does your partner find it difficult or impossible ot apologize or admit when he is wrong? Does she make excuses for her behavior or tend to blame others for her mistakes?

20. Does your partner constantly pressure you for sex or try to persuade you to engage in sexual acts that you find disgusting? Has he ever threatened to find someone else who will have sex with or who will engage in the activities he is interested in?

The author says that if you answered half or more of these questions with a yes, you are definitely being emotionally abused. But a yes answer to even a few of the above questions can also indicate emotional abuse. More than anything else, what characterizes an emotionally abusive relationship is a consistent pattern of hurtful, humiliating and condescending behavior.

10:23 pm
December 6, 2005


Philmore Bowles

New Member

posts -1

That's scary. I used to be that person. Wow.

Sorry Heather.

10:29 pm
December 6, 2005


Rasputin

New Member

posts -1

This is so Intriguing and Interesting Y&R!!!!

Thanks sweetheart for this post and book reference!

However, I will be able to answer this questionnaire as soon as I start a serious relatioship! LOL

In the meantime I wish you enjoy reading and studying that book!

~Ras~

11:27 pm
December 6, 2005


free2choose

New Member

posts -1

WOW….I'm the same as Philmore…That used to be me… Some of it still is… I'm printing that and taking it to my next therapy session… Thanks for posting that!

Erica

2:26 am
December 7, 2005


Lass

New Member

posts -1

Yep.

I do see my husband in this. Heavily. I think he would freak if i asked him to read it. Very defensive. But he is starting to look. How does someone become so insecure and afraid of ridicule? Of being corrected. And more importantly, how does one overcome that fear? That is what seems to be behind his behavior. Any insights???

LL

2:30 am
December 7, 2005


chloeysmomma

New Member

posts -1

that was me three chloeysmomma

3:26 am
December 7, 2005


Philmore Bowles

New Member

posts -1

Lass-

As to the "being right", I learned somewhere that this behavior is an animal instinct that never really went away for men. At one point, being wrong meant being lunch for Homo Sapiens. Back in those days the biggest male around was the law, so to speak, and he couldn't afford to be wrong for a variety of (animal) reasons.

Many men still instinctively operate this way, mistaking inflexability and dominance for strength. When they feel like they are wrong, their value and self esteem take a hit. Some guys don't have the emotional resources to take too many of those hits, so they just learn to attack first.

Another, less objective take is that these are habits of a lazy mind. It's easy to always be right. You don't have to learn, you don't have listen, you don't have to grow. Looking back on myself, I see a clueless coward trying to look tough.

Too many men are ready to take on everyone and anyone but themselves.

As to the rest of the list, remember that if your hubby has suffered a lot in life that this kind of behavior is probably an unconcious defense mechanism and not necessarily a reflection of his deepest being – or his true feelings about you.

I used to do a lot of this same stuff to get my needs met without having to be vulnerable, and without having to contribute my fair share in the relationship. It's also a great way to avoid taking responsibility for his (my) own needs.

It's your fault if I don't feel just dandy, right – do me or I'll kill myself! ;)

At the same time, I knew damn well there was a problem and I did every conniving thing I could to avoid change, while still getting what I wanted from her.

After all this time, it's hard to believe that people still live like that every day. I'm sorry, but I would never put up with that sh*t now – not even from me.

I hope your man comes around for an honest look at himself. Overcoming is simple. It's all about him making the choice to handle the problem. There are only about one million avenues away from this behavior – just pick one buddy, and get to work.

If you really want to help him in the right direction, be patient and be persistent. I'm afraid I'm more of a cold glass of water in the face type of appraoch myself – but hey, that's what always worked on me.

Defensiveness is a clear indicator of fear. He is bound to be threatened by new ideas. We all are. We are also all capable of great transformation.

I wish you guys all the best.

9:18 am
December 7, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

Yikes –

I hate to admit that I answered yes to 75% or more – but it isn't my BF that is the abuser, it's ME!

I am working on this – cuz I don't like being this way.

9:42 am
December 7, 2005


addicts wife

New Member

posts -1

Okaaay…. So, Im reading this… and thinking after that… don't a lot of people have SOME of these character traits, and If so, is there a difference between being an abuser, and realy insecure? Or emotionally unstable??
AND , Im also wondering at the moment… IF gone though a traumatic situation, Isnt some of this behavior a reaction to abuse, and not the abuse itself?? There are so many grey areas to me.
I know though, that If you feel chronicaly belittled, and insignificant due to someones constant harshness, and manipulitive ways it is abusive… I guess ther ereally is no complete textbook check list to go by definig a person, huh??

For isstance, J can hardly stand being wrong, but he is always interested in debating it to be prove nwrong to learn something, a different perspective. He ca nbe combative and defensive… but is that abusive?? I KNOw he's an addict, and hasnt really learned coping mechanisms for emotions… but I am struggling with wether or not he is abusive, as I think it to be. he abuses HI

I dont think Im making much sence at the moment… trying to sort this out…
I'll ponder this for a while…..
Hmmmmmm Deep thoughts.
AW

10:05 am
December 7, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

AW –

could this just be denial or excusing the behaviour?

I think that if we possess these behaviours on a regular basis – and possess MANY Of them – as he last part of the questionaire states – then it's time to worry.

but if there is only one or two behaviours – yeah, it's something else entirely.

But if your partner exhibits more than a handful of these behaviours – no matter WHAT the reason – it is abusive.

And yes, sometimes the behaviours are a reaction to being abused – it is possible to be abusive back to the abuser (it's like hitting back after you have been hit).

But even that is an unhealthy situation.

A debate is one thing – combative is another – there is a difference. Debating with someone is an open discussion where you are hearing the other person and responding in a logical, thought out manner. Combativeness is NOT – it's responding in defense, without thought or care of the other person's viewpoint or thoughts or feelings. Nobody likes to be wrong – but if they are too defensive – a debate is worthless and only ends up a competition to prove he is right in the end.

I am an abuser – but I am an abuser because I AM emotionally unstable. That is not an excuse. It is a behaviour as a result of the emotional instability – a symptom. And it does not make my abuse excuseable. Maybe in court I could get a lesser sentence or get off on mental disease plea – but in the real world, it does not exuse hurtful behaviours….it's a surefire way to hurt someone else and lose potentially valuable relationships and love. Insecurity is another way to say emotionally unstable – or maybe a symptom of it. But again, does not excuse the abuse. It is fixable.

Sometimes we hate questionaires like this because they point out flaws in us or our loved ones that we dont want to see – so we find ways to excuse them. Be careful that's not what you are doing.

I do agree that a few scattered behaviours does not make a person an abuser – but it's some part of their personality that leaves room for improvement. And just because they don't have all of the behaviours – and in essence, are not abusers – does not mean they shouldn't work harder on making that part of their behaviours better – because they are harmful – by themselves or as a group.

10:54 am
December 7, 2005


addicts wife

New Member

posts -1

((((Ali))))
You said a lot of what iwas thinking, but was posting too soon before processing it all.
I think a lot of my own behaviors in always looking for reason, definition, and a diagnosis tend to make me look to hard for htings, at times… but also at times the results are valid, and should be given consideration.
J abuses a drug of choice that can/has been/ and is very destructive, causing a lot of turmoil and distress for everyone, including himself. Which leads to unhealthy behaviors stemming form unhealthy habits. I know there is a broad spectrum of levels of abusive traits, behaviors.. and at times he is abusive, but when he's doing good, stays clean and sober and on task wit hlife, and a healthy routine he is wonderful, then the addiction slithers in and I can see the evil change morph over him, and I know he will "disappear" for about 24-48 hours every six months or so, or when someone passes away, etc. there are lots of triggers.
I'm feeling that J is someone with a lot of things to work through, and get past etc, kinda needs to rewire his programming, but overall, he is a great person, caring, helpful, supportive, loving and genuinely my best friend and confidante. When Dr. Jekyl shows up, it is not that way, and I react or have reacted in ways I too know are unhealthy.. not sure if they qualify as abusive, and not making excuses for any of it… just getting a perspective and "coming to terms with " a lot of this.
I know i am someone who needs resources, diagnoses, and something to identify issues, etc. have always been fascinated with family dynamics,psychology,etc, and can often read too much into a lot of medical research… In My medical training I was awful… read symptoms for things I couldnt possibly have and would think I was getting it… sort of.
Perhaps J is abusive, since drug abuse has the word ABUSe right there blaring at ya'.
And although we are oth getting help, workingwith each other on many life issues and ourselves… I think We are more Dysfunctional than abusive.and actively working on it.
I know i can't expect miraculous changes "overnight" and that just putting a label on it doesnt make it all better… but this questionare realy triggered a lot of thought…
After J's last "binge" I was feeling so beside myself and was struggling with the whole scenario and feeling like this was all a terrible mess… because it was.. .and labeld it all as "an abusive relationship." cut out al lthe grey areas, cut out all the wonderful , fabulous things and just sat there sinking in the thoughts(ralization(s) ) that tis was abusive.
it definatley sucked and was quite a roller coaster, because i was like "how the HECK did I get here, Of all places?!?!?!?"
I guess alot ofwhat i believed to be abusive was based on how My father was.. violently physically and emotionally abusive addict, and the difference is that he was abusive daily, my mother almost died from a lot of what he did.. and I compared that to J and I, didnt match, or addup..So I dismissed it as just J being a part time crackhead.And I feel that my father was a lost cause, never ever took responsibilty for any of hisactions, never identifed a thing or worked on it. J knows , and has accepted a lot, most of but not all of his As he puts it "ahortcomings" has sincere remorse, and is making huge, sincere efforts ot better himself FOr himself, Me, and his child and family. My father was a blamer, a con artist, a theif and a felon who was just gross, and it all progressed fast.. pretty myuch as soon as they had the marraige license.
Wheeewwwey… a lot to sink in here… but I'm okay with it, because I know I'm working on "my baggage" and believe that J is too.doesnt change or excuse any of it, but clarified a lot of what Ive been processing.

thanks for reading me going on my tangent here!!!
I appreciate everything!!!
(((hugs)))
AW

11:00 am
December 7, 2005


kathygy

New Member

posts -1

addicts wife, I see a lot of excuse making and minimizing in your post.

Young & Restless,

I am very glad to see this list posted here because I sense a lot of denial on this web site. No one ever, ever deserves to be abused. Everyone deserves to be treated with love and respect ALL of the time. And its very important to be able to recognize abuse.

One point I disagree with is if anyone answers 'yes' to even ONE of these items they are being emotionally abused. Of course the more 'yeses' the more abuse. If someone is being abused I think its very important whether your partner is willing to work on his or her treatment of their partner.

I can answer 'no' to every one of these when I think about my last relationship for both of us so it is entirely possible to have a relationship without ANY of these types of abuse. No has to tolerate abuse.

When I was married (before my recovery) I did insist on always getting my way, I did seem impossible to please to my husband,I also found it hard to apoligize. But I am oceans away from that behavior now. I have completely changed.

I can also see some abuse from my 'saintly' ex-husband. He made me account for money I spent, he constantly pressured me for sex, and he felt that I was the one with the 'problem'. Also, he would withdraw a lot. Its a bit of an eye opener to think of my ex-husband as ever being abusive. He always said he had a deep and unselfish love for me. But he had no insight into his part in the relationship not working.

11:09 am
December 7, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

AW –

just because it is "better" doesn't mean it isn't still abuse.

He may have better qualities than dad – and be "less" abusive than dad – but it's still abuse.

He may be trying – and I am thankful for you that he is – but if the abuse is present – and continues – you really are "settling".

I know that I figured my relationship with my current BF was "better" than my last – at least he wasn't an alcohlic – but the turmoil and abuse remained. That doesn't make it right, just because it was "better" than the last.

Please consider what you are saying – and be careful you aren't denying how painful your situation really is…or romanticizing what you got because he is "trying" and because he is "better" than dear old dad.

11:54 am
December 7, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

Something just dawned on me.

I have been in coda for almost four months now – so I should be working on step four – which is taking an moral inventory of oneself.

I was struggling with this – as it is hard to "see" what's wrong with your actions, when you grew up to believe you were doing things right.

This poll has become my moral inventory. And it's scary, cuz I didn't realize how many "defects of character" I truly had. Or how defective my ability to love someone was.

I am going to print this out and use it as my guide in recovery.

Thanks for this….you have no idea how grateful I am for it!

12:03 pm
December 7, 2005


addicts wife

New Member

posts -1

I realize he is abusive, and abuses drugs. I have been proccessing all of this, and stating what I was thinking as i was coming to terms weith it all… Didnt mean to make it sound as If i was just like "well, Thsi is it, Ive labeled it and settling for it."
I recognised that I was comparing a worst case scenario wit ha mid range scenario and that it still qualifies as abuse.
In the beginning of My relationship with J i made a lot of exzcuses for it, because I didnt know really what it was, and was thinking naivley that "this was a blip.. wonthappen agin, people make mistakes.. etc."
Just recently though goingthrough all this Im learning my role in this(enabling, excusemaking, codep) and his, and calling it what it is, really.
What Ive been questioning in the past month or so was 'okay, if someone has
done a couple of abusive things does that give them the title of "AbUSER"??
I am determiningthat it does.And just because i know the triggers of it, does NOT excuse it at all.that is a huge part of why I set my boundaries, am following through on what i will accept and not accept, and have had to state ultimatums,so to speak. I fully realize that no one can make another change, that it has to come from with in, and Ive let go enough t ostart proactively workong on my own health, mentally and physically, and His own stuff Is for him to work.and he has been working it. Doesnt mean Im not going to keep boxes in the attic, and leave if /when Ihave to , or should. I still have a lot of work to do, and so does he. Im doing my part on my own stuff and have been feeling stronger and healthier than ever… Not that Im "Fine." I take one day at a time.

Okay.. I just rereadthe questionare with a pen to check off Yes's so Im wondering now…

I answered YES to #5)because i have felt like that in the past, and recent past at times. so "Yes" to #5…

also recognised that I do #9)
Ive said this becasue I will not accept drugs in my house and do not want ot be with a person who actively uses drugs, even if it is not daily and it's every few months or so. I said this In October, adn I meant it.

Sooo, am I an abuser for having boundries?? am I confusing myself??
ma i overanylizing here??

12:13 pm
December 7, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

I think you are overanalyzing this.

I think it's a tool to open one's eyes.

I think you may have some behaviours that need changing – or that you need to communicate in a less "abusive" way.

But no – suggesting you will leave if he doesn't stop drugs is NOT abuse.

You answered yes to TWO things – in my mind, that does not make you an abuser. You don't do those two things EVER day either – only regarding the drug issue.

I think you need to look at the "bigger picture" – if you are demanding your own way or you will leave on EVERYTHING – or a majority of things – then perhaps you are going too far. But still not an abuser, at least from where I sit.

I think the reality check is that if you checked off a handful – and this is who you are on a daily basis – or a good percentage of time – then you have work to do.

And if you don't want to have to answer yes to #5 & #9 – then be in a happy, healthy relationship, that does not put you in the position to use that kind of ultimatum.

1:07 pm
December 7, 2005


kathygy

New Member

posts -1

addicts wife,

"5. Do you find yourself “walking on eggshells?” Do you spend a lot of time monitoring our behavior and/or watching for your partner’s bad moods before bringing up a subject? "

Which part of this do you say 'yes' to? All of it?

I would not minimize having to say 'yes' to this. I see this as a very big deal if you feel that you need to walk on eggshells or you have to watch your partner's mood before bringing up a subject.

This effects your sense of safety and relaxation in your own home. Home needs to be a sanctuary, a place where you can let your hair down and just be you without having to monitor yourself at all, ever. Where you feel free to say anything of course from a place of love and respect.

1:12 pm
December 7, 2005


kathygy

New Member

posts -1

The way I look at it is if you find yourself doing this you are being codependent because you are giving your power away. At the same time your husband is being abusive when he creates an atmosphere where you don't feel safe. But ultimately its up to you whether you want to give him this much power over you.

1:18 pm
December 7, 2005


addicts wife

New Member

posts -1

I felt ot be truly honest that i had ot say "Yes" to #5) because when he would come home after using, I would feel thatway. I didnt know what this drug did to him, and how he would be If i yelled, showed how much this hurt, pissed me off, etc. It was on occassion, whe nI was unsure if these drugs(Crack) were still effecting his mental state, and I was scared If I was safe not knowing if he was still high. so I guees at closer lok at the question.. I doont "spend a lot of time monitoring our behavior and/or watching…"
But since i have in the past, I answered "Yes."
and since i am aware that alcohol effects people's moods, adrenaline, etc… I was not sure if something as chemically charged and Powerful os crack would still be presnt i nhis system whe nhe did come home.
On the occassions he has gone on binges, when he comes home though, he is usually "Beating himself up" saying how disgusted he is with himself, and very remorseful about losong control of himself and unable to fight these urges. Never saw violence or threats or anything like that,a lot of guilt and self loathing.. and me feeling like I was on an emotional rollarcoaster.

1:26 pm
December 7, 2005


kathygy

New Member

posts -1

addicts wife,

I'm certainly not suggesting that you be abusive when he's like this and do any of the following:

"yelled, showed how much this hurt, pissed me off, etc".

Not walking on eggshells does not mean being abusive. What I really was refering to was to detach from his mood and not let it effect you. When let someone else's mood change yours that is being codependent.

You can't have a rational conversation with someone who is on drugs.

What I really believe is that you should NEVER, EVER have to live in such an atmosphere. 'On occcassion' is too often. I would not tolerate it in my own home.

1:51 pm
December 7, 2005


addicts wife

New Member

posts -1

yep… I know I am codependant… nd have been addressingthis and working on my behaviors in a healthy way… eve nstarted therapy again.
I do agree that him creating an atmosphere where you don't feel safe Is abusive and a problem. He knows i will not allow drugs in my home, but if theyre still in HIM, they are in my home… adn I didnt feel so much that my putting my foot down and expressing anger about it was neccessarily abusive, because I have a right to my boundries and to express them, and my feelings. Detaching was healthy and seeking another living arangement wqas certainly within reason, IF it continues or happens again, and IF i didnt see any [roactive assertiveness to get into recovery.. which I have.
Today… I feel he is taking the steps to be in recovery, and have seen a lot of growth in him.
The last month was very transitional for me, and I'm sorting it all out one day at a time, and part of that is to identify, and acknowledge where I am, and how I am caring for Myself and speaking my mind, working on my health issues, addressing and working on what I need to for my own growth and self help, and improvement.while tring to balance my needs and wants with trying otbe organized, focused and healthy.

2:34 pm
December 7, 2005


kathygy

New Member

posts -1

addicts wife,

certainly, putting your foot down and expressing your anger is not abusive in and of its self as long as you use 'I' statements. It can be abusive if there is any yelling or name calling or putting the other person down and such.

2:42 pm
December 7, 2005


Anonymous

New Member

posts -1

My most significant partner was the man I share a child with. We stared dating when I was 19 years old and had a six year on and off again relationship. Things were good for a while, and then became very bad as his alcohol and drug abuse became more and more obvious to me. Since the break-up with him, I’ve been very protective of my heart and very careful about how close I get to others, for fear of being hurt.

As I read over this questionnaire, pen in hand, I was prepared to validate my self by checking off all the ways that Mike abused and hurt me… But, I couldn’t find those hurts in the category of emotional abuse. Well, he did #10, and #14. It’s funny today, but in my immaturity, I thought it was very exciting when he did # 10 and I thought it proved that he loved me. Number 14 he still does to this day, but that’s a different thread entirely. It’s now clear to me now that mike didn’t emotionally abuse me, the way I believed him to. It’s more accurate to say that he disappointed me by not living up to my expectations of him for our relationship.

Want to hear something scary?

As it turns out, I am the one who emotionally abused him…

I unconsciously chose Mike, because he was a safe and easygoing guy who would never emotionally abuse me the way that my sister did. My sister emotionally abused me with numbers #1,3,5,6,7,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19…and a few that author hasn’t even mentioned. As a result, hated her; I hated the effects on my self esteem; and I vowed to never relate to another human being in that way. Unfortunately, the very same people who get emotionally abused sometimes are the very same people who emotionally abuse others.

With the evidence right in front of me, I can’t deny the many abusive things I did to Michael. Me? An emotional abuser?!?


About the AllAboutCounseling.com Forum

Most Users Ever Online: 247

Currently Online:
47 Guests

Currently Browsing this Topic:
1 Guest

Forum Stats:

Groups: 8
Forums: 74
Topics: 37716
Posts: 717113

Membership:

There are 82305 Members
There have been 34 Guests

There are 3 Admins

Top Posters:

onedaythiswillpass – 977
zarathustra – 562
StronginHim77 – 453
2013ways – 419
curious64 – 408
free – 372

Recent New Members: admin

Administrators: ShiningLight (506 Posts), admin (21 Posts), emily430 (0 Posts)


 

Copyright © 2014 Internet Brands, Inc. All rights reserved. Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookies